1. COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIADEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
  1. CONTINUING PLANNING PROCESS
  2. WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT
  3. COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIADEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
  4. CONTINUING PLANNING PROCESS
  5. WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT
  6. (1999 UPDATE)
      1. A. CPP Requirements and History
      2. B. The State Water Quality Management Process
      3. C. Program Funding
      4. D. Program Coordination Mechanisms
      5. E. Public participation processes
      6. under Section 208 and applicable basin plans under Section 209 of the Act
      7. including schedules for revision
      8. implementation of the State WQM program
      9. TRIENNIAL REVIEW OF WATER QUALITY CRITERIA AND STANDARDS:
      10. TR-85 (Phase I):
      11. TR-89 (Phase II):
      12. TR-92:
      13. Regulatory Basics Initiative (RBI):
      14. water treatment processing
      15. A. State Documents Related to Introduction
      16. 2. Department of Environmental Protection
      17. Regional Offices
      18. Southwest Office
      19. Southcentral Office
      20. Northeast Office
      21. District Mining Offices Duties Counties
      22. McMurray District Mining Office
      23. DISTRICT MINING OFFICES
      24. District Mining Offices Duties Counties
      25. Greensburg District Mining Office
      26. B. State Documents Indexed to CPP Process
      27. 1. Index of State CPP-Related Documents
      28. Section 208 and basin management plans under Section 209 of the Clean Water Act
      29. effluent limits
      30. implementation of the State water quality management program
      31. quality standards including schedules of compliance
      32. water treatment processing
      33. treatment works
      34. OTHER
      35. 3. List of EPA Approved Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)
      36. List of Approved 1998 TMDLs
      37. List of Approved 1999 TMDLs
      38. Stream Code Stream Name Miles Degraded
      39. PCB/Chlordane
      40. Continuing Planning Process for Water Quality Management
      41. Department of Environmental Protection
      42. 10/25/99
      43. General Comments:
      44. EPA Comments
      45. SECTION I
      46. C. ‘Program Funding’
      47. E. ‘Public Participation Process’
      48. SECTION II
      49. Element 1
      50. Element 3
      51. Element 4
      52. Element 5
      53. Element 6
      54. Element 9
      55. SECTION III
      56. Department of Environmental Protection

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Back to top


CONTINUING PLANNING PROCESS
FOR

Back to top


WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page i
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
OFFICE OF WATER MANAGEMENT
DOCUMENT NUMBER:
394-0810-001
TITLE:
Pennsylvania’s Continuing Planning Process for Water Quality Management
EFFECTIVE DATE:
December 31, 1999
AUTHORITY:
Clean Water Act Section 303 (e)(1)
POLICY:
Section 303(e)(1) of the federal Clean Water Act, requires each state to have and
maintain a Continuing Planning Process (CPP) which describes processes used to
manage water quality programs.
PURPOSE:
In May of 1976, the Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of Water
Quality Management, prepared and submitted a CPP for the Pennsylvania water
quality management program. The United States Environmental Protection
Agency (USEPA) reviewed and approved that document. Several subsequent
submittals to USEPA, including construction grant program regulation
amendments in 1978, revisions to state population projections, and a non-point
toxics report in 1984, were identified as additions to the Pennsylvania CPP.
Since the late 1970’s, the Department of Environmental Resources, now the
Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP), has revised many of the
processes described in the original CPP and its supplements, and the Pennsylvania
General Assembly has enacted new and amended legislation which are now a part
of the water quality management program. Section 303 (e)(2) of the clean Water
Act requires USEPA to review a state’s approved CPP from time to time to ensure
its consistency with the Act. In 1997, USEPA requested PADEP to prepare and
submit an update to the Pennsylvania CPP to reflect program changes that have
occurred since the previous submittals. An interim update was submitted on
January 31, 1998. This expansion to the interim update has been prepared to
respond to USEPA comments.
APPLICABILITY:
USEPA Region III has advised PADEP that a CPP is not intended to be a broad
based document like a state water quality management strategy or like a state
program plan. With this advice in mind, the objectives of this CPP update are to
briefly describe the water quality management activities of PADEP programs and
those of other agencies, to describe the linkages between Pennsylvania’s water
quality management activities and the federal CPP elements, and to respond to
recent USEPA comments. For persons seeking more specific information, this
CPP update provides references to many documents and other sources available to
the public that describe water quality management program activities in greater
detail.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page ii
The federal regulations at 40 CFR Part 130.5 describe nine specific processes that
a state must include in its CPP document. These processes are: (1) developing
effluent limitations and schedules of compliance at least as stringent as those
required by Sections 301(b)(1) and (2), 306 and 307, and at least as stringent as
any requirements contained in applicable water quality standards in effect under
authority of Section 303 of the Act: (2) incorporating elements of any applicable
areawide waste treatment plans under Section 208, and applicable basin plans
under Section 209 of the Act; (3) developing total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)
and individual water quality-based effluent limitations for pollutants in accordance
with Section 303(d) of the Act and Section 130.7(a); (4) updating and maintaining
Water Quality Management (WQM) plans, including schedules for revision; (5)
assuring adequate authority for intergovernmental cooperation in the
implementation of state water quality management program; (6) establishing and
assuring adequate implementation of new or revised water quality standards; (7)
assuring adequate controls over the disposition of all residual waste from any
water treatment processing; (8) developing an inventory and ranking, in order of
priority of needs, for construction of waste treatment works required to meet the
applicable requirements of Sections 301 and 302 of the Act: and (9) determining
the priority of permit issuance. The regulations in 40 CFR Section 130.7 (a)
require that the process for incorporating public involvement in the Section 303(d)
list and the development of TMDL’s also be included in a state’s CPP document.
The body of this CPP update focuses on these specific elements.
DISCLAIMER:
The policies and procedures outlined in this guidance document are intended to
supplement existing requirements. Nothing in the policies or procedures herein
shall affect more stringent regulatory requirements. The policies or procedures
herein are not an adjudication or a regulation. There is no intent on the part of the
Department to give the rules in these policies that weight of deference. The
policies and procedures merely announce the policy that the Department intends to
apply in determining emergency situations and in authorizing emergency work,
writing emergency services contracts, and purchasing commodities on an
expedited basis. The Department reserves the right to deviate from this policy.
PAGE LENGTH:
99 pages
LOCATION:
Volume 31, Tab 04
DEFINITION:
None

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page iii
CONTENTS
SECTION I
INTRODUCTION
This section contains an overview of the federal Continuing Planning Process (CPP) requirements, a summary
history of the Pennsylvania CPP, a brief discussion of Pennsylvania’s process for CPP development, and a
description of Pennsylvania’s water quality management process.
Page
A. CPP Requirements and History................................................................................................... 1
B. The State Water Quality Management Process ........................................................................... 2
C. Program Funding........................................................................................................................ 12
D. Program Coordination Mechanisms ............................................................................................ 16
E. Public Participation Processes .................................................................................................... 18
SECTION II
THE CONTINUING PLANNING PROCESS ELEMENTS
This section contains, for each of the nine CPP elements, a narrative describing basic facts about state
program provisions and activities, including public participation, which relate to the CPP element. References
to key documents related to the element are also provided.
A. Element 1................................................................................................................................... 21
B. Element 2................................................................................................................................... 23
C. Element 3................................................................................................................................... 24
D. Element 4................................................................................................................................... 27
E. Element 5................................................................................................................................... 30
F. Element 6................................................................................................................................... 34
G. Element 7................................................................................................................................... 41
H. Element 8................................................................................................................................... 42
I. Element 9................................................................................................................................... 43

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page iv
SECTION III
RELATED DOCUMENTS
This section contains organization charts for the PA Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) and
its Regional Offices and District Mining Offices, a listing of important documents that describe in detail the
processes and technical guidances used to administer the water quality management program, a table which
provides a cross-reference, and a list of approved TMDLs.
A. Documents Related to Introduction ............................................................................................ 45
1. PADEP Organizational Charts.............................................................................................. 46
2. PADEP Regional Offices...................................................................................................... 47
3. PADEP District Mining Offices ............................................................................................ 48
B. State Documents Indexed to CPP Process .................................................................................. 50
1. Index of State CPP - Related Documents.............................................................................. 51
a. Documents related to §130.5(b)(1) process for developing effluent limitations
and schedules of compliance ........................................................................................... 51
b. Documents related to §130(b)(2) process for incorporating elements of
applicable areawide waste treatment plans under Section 208 and basin management
plans under Section 209 of the Clean Water Act. ............................................................ 59
c. Documents related to §130.5(b)(3) process for developing total maximum
daily loads and individual water quality based effluent limits............................................ 63
d. Documents related to §130.5(b)(4) process for updating and maintaining
water quality management plans...................................................................................... 68
e. Documents related to §130.5(b)(5) process for assuring adequate authority
for intergovernmental cooperation in the implementation of the State Water
Quality Management Program......................................................................................... 70
f. Documents related to §130.5(b)(6) process for establishing and assuring adequate
implementation of new or revised water quality standards including schedules
of compliance ................................................................................................................. 74
g. Documents related to §130.5(b)(7) process for assuring adequate controls over
the disposition of residual waste from water treatment processing ................................... 78
h. Documents related to §130.5(b)(8) process for developing an inventory and
ranking the need for construction of waste treatment works ............................................ 80
i. Documents related to §130.5(b)(a) process for determining the priority
of permit issuance ........................................................................................................... 81
2. Cross-Reference Table.......................................................................................................... 83

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page v
3. List of EPA Approved Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)............................................. 91
SECTION IV
COMMENT/RESPONSE DOCUMENT
A notice requesting public comments on the Continuing Planning Process for Water Quality Management was
announced in the Pennsylvania Bulletin (Volume 29-5013 Doc. 99-1632, September 25, 1999 and in the DEP
Update September 24, 1999. The Continuing Planning Process for Water Quality Management was also
posted on the DEP Website. Comments were received from EPA Region III and the Delaware Riverkeeper.
The comments were reviewed and incorporated in the CPP as appropriate.
A. EPA Comments/DEP Responses ................................................................................................ 93
B. Delaware Riverkeeper Comments/DEP Responses ..................................................................... 97

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 1

Back to top


COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Back to top


CONTINUING PLANNING PROCESS
FOR

Back to top


WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

Back to top


(1999 UPDATE)
Section I - Introduction
A. CPP Requirements and History
Section 303(e)(1) of the federal Clean Water Act, requires each state to have and maintain a Continuing
Planning Process (CPP) which describes processes used to manage water quality programs. In May of 1976,
the Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of Water Quality Management, prepared and submitted
a CPP for the Pennsylvania water quality management program. The USEPA reviewed and approved that
document. Several subsequent submittals to USEPA, including construction grant program regulation
amendments in 1978, revisions to state population projections, and a non-point toxics report in 1984, were
identified as additions to the Pennsylvania CPP.
Since the late 1970s, the Department of Environmental Resources, now Department of Environmental
Protection (PADEP), has revised many of the processes described in the original CPP and its supplements,
and the Pennsylvania General Assembly has enacted new and amended legislation which are now a part of the
water quality management program. Section 303(e)(2) of the Clean Water Act requires USEPA to review a
state’s approved CPP from time to time to ensure its consistency with the Act. In 1997, USEPA requested
PADEP to prepare and submit an update to the Pennsylvania CPP to reflect program changes that have
occurred since the previous submittals. An interim update was submitted on January 31, 1998. This
expansion to the interim update has been prepared to respond to USEPA comments. In preparation for
future USEPA requests for CPP updates, PADEP will identify new and revised documents that constitute
CPP revisions.
USEPA Region III has advised PADEP that a CPP is not intended to be a broad-based document like a state
water quality management strategy or like a state program plan. With this advice in mind, the objectives of
this CPP update are to briefly describe the water quality management activities of PADEP programs and
those of other agencies, to describe the linkages between Pennsylvania’s water quality management program
activities and the federal CPP elements, and to respond to recent USEPA comments. For persons seeking
more specific information, this CPP update provides references to many documents and other sources
available to the public that describe water quality management program activities in greater detail.
The federal regulations at 40 CFR Part 130.5 describe nine specific processes that a state must include in its
CPP document. These processes are: (1) developing effluent limitations and schedules of compliance at least
as stringent as those required by Sections 301(b)(1) and (2), 306 and 307, and at least as stringent as any
requirements contained in applicable water quality standards in effect under authority of Section 303 of the

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 2
Act; (2) incorporating elements of any applicable areawide waste treatment plans under Section 208, and
applicable basin plans under Section 209 of the Act; (3) developing total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and
individual water quality-based effluent limitations for pollutants in accordance with Section 303(d) of the Act
and Section 130.7(a); (4) updating and maintaining Water Quality Management (WQM) plans, including
schedules for revision; (5) assuring adequate authority for intergovernmental cooperation in the
implementation of the state water quality management program; (6) establishing and assuring adequate
implementation of new or revised water quality standards, including schedules of compliance, under Section
303(c) of the Act ; (7) assuring adequate controls over the disposition of all residual waste from any water
treatment processing; (8) developing an inventory and ranking, in order of priority of needs, for construction
of waste treatment works required to meet the applicable requirements of Sections 301 and 302 of the Act;
and (9) determining the priority of permit issuance. The regulations at 40 CFR Section 130.7(a) require that
the process for incorporating public involvement in the development of the Section 303(d) list and the
development of TMDLs also be included in a state’s CPP document. The body of this CPP update focuses
on these specific elements.
In preparing this CPP update, PADEP sought public input through an informational notice in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
and in DEP’s
Update
. This document was also posted on DEP’s website: www.
dep.state.pa.us/dep/subject/pub-par-cen.html.
B. The State Water Quality Management Process
There is a broad array of state, interstate/international and local (County; Volunteer) organizations involved
in implementing PA’s water quality management program. The following is a description of the roles played
by each:
1. State Agencies (For additional information, visit the Commonwealth’s website (www.state.pa.us/)
a. PA Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP)
PADEP is the lead state agency for administering Pennsylvania’s environmental laws and regulations,
including those related to water quality management. PADEP is a member of the Environmental
Quality Board (EQB), a 20-member independent board that adopts all of PADEP’s regulations. The
Secretary of PADEP chairs the EQB.
PADEP’s organizational structure includes the Secretary who is assisted by an executive deputy
secretary for Policy and Communications; deputy secretaries for Pollution Prevention and Compliance
Assistance; Air, Recycling and Radiation Protection; Water Management; Field Operations; Mineral
Resources Management; Management and Technical Services; and a chief counsel. The deputates are
divided into bureaus which are divided into divisions. Field Operations has six regional offices and 20
district offices. Mineral Resources Management has six district mining offices. Primary
responsibilities for water quality management are within the Water Management, Field Operations
and Mineral Resources Management deputates. PADEP’s organizational chart can be found in
Section III.A.
The Water Management deputate is charged with protecting and managing the quantity and quality of
Pennsylvania’s water resources. It is responsible for developing and submitting the state’s Continuing
Planning Process, receiving input to the process, and coordinating with other agencies that have
implementation responsibilities for portions of the state’s water quality management program.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 3
The PA Quality Management Plan provides the overall quality assurance program framework and
management system necessary to assure that data generated by or for the Department are of
acceptable quality to meet the needs of users and decision-makers.
Within the Water Management deputate, the following bureaus have water quality management
related responsibilities. The Bureau of Watershed Conservation is responsible for stormwater
management, water quality assessment and standards development, ambient monitoring, development
and coordination of the state Nonpoint Source Management Program, Coastal Zone Management
Program implementation, Clean Lakes Program and National Estuary Program coordination. The
Bureau of Water Quality Protection administers the wastewater permitting, monitoring, compliance
and treatment design standards programs; provides program oversight, evaluation and technical
support to PA’s 66 county conservation districts; oversees and coordinates implementation of
PADEP’s Chesapeake Bay Nonpoint Source Abatement Program and Nutrient Management
Strategy; administers the erosion and sediment pollution control and the waterways and wetlands
protection and restoration programs; and administers the water obstructions and encroachments
program, including state Chapter 105 permits, and coordination with the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers in the administration of the federal Section 404 permit (for disposal of dredge and fill
materials) program and associated CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certifications. The Bureau of
Water Supply Management administers the Operator Outreach Program, provides planning and
predesign assistance to applicants for PA Infrastructure Investment Authority Act funding, and
administers the federal sewerage construction grants and state sewerage grant programs and the state
Sewage Facilities Act planning and enforcement grants program. The Bureau of Waterways
Engineering administers a program for the comprehensive regulation and supervision of dams and
reservoirs to protect health and safety and to conserve and protect water quality (including wetlands
protection), conducts environmental assessments for certain dams in wetlands and exceptional value
waters, administers the water quality certification program for dams under Section 401 of the federal
Clean Water Act, and administers a stream improvement program.
The Field Operations deputate oversees and coordinates field activities in PADEP’s environmental
programs and serves as liaison between field operations regional directors and central office bureaus
on policy matters. The six regional offices and 20 district offices are responsible for the permitting,
inspection, enforcement and compliance, emergency response and other field service activities within
their assigned areas. Each regional office is assigned a specific number of counties. The assignment
takes into consideration the workload within the counties and river basin boundaries. A list of the
regional office locations and their county assignments can be found in Section III.A.
The Mineral Resources Management deputate is responsible for the development of policies and
implementation of programs that regulate or impact minerals extraction including oil, gas, industrial
minerals and coal. Within this deputate, the following bureaus have water quality management
related responsibilities. The Bureau of Mining and Reclamation administers a regulatory program for
all mining activities, including regulating discharges from mining activities under the NPDES
permitting program. The Bureau of Oil and Gas Management is responsible for the oil and gas
conservation and management program, including regulating discharges from oil and gas exploration
and development activities under the NPDES permitting program. The Bureau of Abandoned Mine
Reclamation administers PADEP’s Abandoned Mine Reclamation program, including abating or
treating acid mine drainage from abandoned mines. The Bureau of District Mining Operations has six
district mining offices that are responsible for all permitting, inspection, enforcement and compliance

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 4
activities within their assigned areas. Each district mining office is assigned a specific number of
counties, taking into consideration the workload within the counties. A list of the District Mining
Office locations and their county assignments can be found in Section III.A.
b. The Environmental Quality Board
The Environmental Quality Board is a 20-member independent board that adopts all of DEP’s
regulations. It is chaired by the Secretary of DEP and was created in response to Act 275.
The 20 members of the Board include eleven state agencies: DEP (Chair), Agriculture, Health,
Community and Economic Development, the Public Utility Commission, the Fish and Boat
Commission, the Game Commission, Labor and Industry, the Governor’s Office of Policy, the
Historical and Museum Commission, Transportation; five members of the Citizens Advisory Council
and four members of the Senate and House. A current membership list and complete informaiton on
the EQB can be found on the DEP website:
http://www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/subject/eqb/what_eqb.htm. The EQB also considers petitions to
change regulations and has other responsibilities including to review State (Clean Air) Implementation
Plan changes, siting a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, adopting a Hazardous Waste
Facilities Plan and considering applications for a certificate of public necessity for hazardous waste
disposal facilities.
c. PA Department of Conservation & Natural Resources (DCNR)
DCNR is an environmental resource agency with broad environmental management responsibilities
ranging from management of the state parks and forests to licensing snowmobiles. Many of its
activities support or supplement PADEP water quality management programs. For example, many of
the state’s Special Protection waters are located in state parks and forests. DCNR manages activities
in these watersheds in a manner that preserves the quality of these special resources. DCNR also
provides mapping and geological assistance to PADEP through its Bureau of Topographic and
Geologic Survey. The Bureau of Forestry maintains the state database on endangered and threatened
species, which helps PADEP to evaluate watersheds for Special Protection status. The Bureau of
Facility Design and Construction works with PADEP on the design, construction and operation of
state park and forest wastewater disposal facilities to assure water quality protection.
d. PA Department of Agriculture (PDA)
PDA carries out a variety of farm-related activities including developing and encouraging proper
farming and conservation practices and regulating the use, handling, storage and transportation of
pesticides. The Department is a member of the EQB. The Secretary of PDA alternates with the
Secretary of PADEP in chairing the State Conservation Commission on an annual basis. PDA (and
PADEP), in cooperation with the State Conservation Commission, works with farmers to develop
and implement nutrient management plans to reduce agricultural nonpoint sources of pollution. PDA
is also responsible for developing and implementing a program to certify individuals to develop
nutrient management plans under the Nutrient Management Act.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 5
e. PA Fish & Boat Commission (PFBC)
PFBC conducts activities that directly support water quality management efforts and is a strong
advocate for unpolluted surface waters to support state fisheries. The Executive Director is a
member of the EQB. PFBC also works with PADEP and the PA Department of Health to jointly
establish/rescind fish consumption advisories, provides input to PADEP relative to stream
designations/redesignations, and conducts fish kill investigations and related follow-up enforcement.
f. Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PIIA)
The Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PIIA) was created in 1988 by the Pennsylvania
Infrastructure Authority Act to help provide more than $2.5 billion in infrastructure funding for
improvements to PA’s drinking water, sewage and stormwater systems. The PIIA has been given the
authority to provide funding assistance in the form of loans, loan guarantees, bond guarantees and
grants. The Authority’s primary funding sources include appropriations from the General Assembly
and grants from USEPA. The Authority may also borrow money, issue bonds and accept gifts,
donations, bequests and settlements from any public or private source. PIIA administers a
construction loan program that provides low-interest loans and supplemental grants for drinking
water, stormwater and wastewater projects, including industrial wastewater systems. Eligible
applicants include municipalities, municipal authorities and other governmental units. In some cases,
private entities may be eligible for funding. This funding program includes the administration of a
revolving loan program under Title VI of the federal Clean Water Act. More information on PIIA’s
involvement in this federal program can be found in the narrative discussion under Elements 5 and 8
in Section II.
PIIA also can provide funding assistance for the cost of preparation of feasibility studies, engineering
designs for drinking water and stormwater systems and for the engineering design of wastewater
systems, and low-interest loans to homeowners for the correction of malfunctioning on-lot sewage
disposal systems.
The business of the Authority is administered by an Executive Director and staff who work closely
with PADEP, the PA Department of Community & Economic Development and the PA Housing
Finance Agency in carrying out its funding programs.
g. State Conservation Commission (SCC)
The SCC is responsible for the conservation of the soil, water and related resources of the
Commonwealth. The Commission has primary responsibility for implementation of the state
Conservation District Law and the Nutrient Management Act. In addition to its powers and duties as
an administrative department, the Commission also has rulemaking authority. Both the state
Departments of Agriculture and Environmental Protection assist the Commission in carrying out its
responsibilities. The Secretaries of PADEP and PDA alternate as chairpersons of the Commission on
an annual basis.
h. PA Game Commission (PGC)
The PGC is responsible for the stewardship of the Commonwealth’s wild birds and wild mammals for
the benefit of present and future generations. The Executive Director is a member of the EQB. The

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 6
PGC also (1) participates in the Commonwealth’s Streambank Fencing Program by providing labor,
equipment and materials to fence livestock out of streams in order to improve water quality and
streamside habitat, and (2) cooperates with PADEP, through an interagency agreement, in the review
of coal mining applications and related activities to address potential wildlife impacts.
i. PA Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC)
The PHMC is responsible for the conservation of Pennsylvania’s historic heritage. The Executive
Director is a member of the EQB. The Commission cooperates with PADEP, through an interagency
agreement, in identifying, evaluating and preserving historic and archaeological resources located in
areas to be impacted by surface coal mining.
j. PA Department of Health (DOH)
DOH is responsible for protecting the health of the people and for enforcing all statutes pertaining to
public health for the prevention and suppression of disease and injury. DOH is a member of the EQB
and works with PADEP and PFBC to jointly establish/rescind fish consumption advisories. DOH also
oversees County Health Department programs (including those activities related to PADEP’s water
pollution control program) and works with PADEP to ensure that water pollution control program
performance standards are being met.
2. County Agencies
a. County Conservation Districts
There are 66 County Conservation Districts in PA. The districts, authorized under the state
Conservation District Law, carry out various activities under delegation agreements with PADEP and
the State Conservation Commission and/or contracts with PADEP and/or PDA, including the
following:
(1) A total of 65 districts have been delegated Erosion Control Program responsibilities (under
Chapter 102 of PADEP’s regulations) at one of three levels. Level I delegation entails (1)
providing technical assistance and training and distributing information on the Erosion Control
Program, and (2) reviewing and processing Earth Disturbance Permit applications and all other
erosion and sediment control plans subject to review under Chapter 102. Level II delegation
includes Level I responsibilities plus program compliance responsibilities which include complaint
investigation and site inspections. Level III delegation includes Level I and Level II
responsibilities as well as program enforcement. Enforcement responsibilities authorize
conservation districts to pursue actions such as enforcement hearings, equity actions and
assessment of civil penalties
(2) A total of 59 districts have been delegated Chapter 102 responsibilities for processing National
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Stormwater Permits associated with Construction
Activities (NPDES Permits).
(3) A total of 43 districts have been delegated responsibilities (under Chapter 105 of PADEP’s
regulations) for various General Permit registrations relating to water obstructions and

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 7
encroachments, including those related to private residential construction in wetlands, abandoned
mine reclamation and agricultural activities.
(4) A total of 56 districts have been delegated program responsibilities in implementing certain
provisions of the state Nutrient Management Act.
(5) A total of 65 districts have contracted with PDA to implement the Dirt and Gravel Roads
Initiative to address the impacts of unpaved roads in the Commonwealth.
(6) A total of 38 districts have contracted with PADEP to carry out nonpoint source/nutrient
management activities under PA’s Chesapeake Bay Program.
(7) A total of 14 districts have contracted with PDA to carry out PA’s Agricultural Land Preservation
Program.
b. County Health Departments
There are six County Health Departments in PA. Three County Health Departments (Allegheny,
Bucks and Erie) carry out PADEP water pollution control program activities related to application
processing, surveillance and monitoring and enforcement. Chester County has established a task
force to determine if its County Health Department should also participate. PADEP provides annual
input to the PA Department of Health through draft program plan reviews and program
implementation evaluations of the three health departments’ water pollution control program
activities.
3. Interstate/International River Basin Organizations
The political boundaries of Pennsylvania span parts of five major watersheds. The five major watersheds
are (1) the Great Lakes, (2) the Ohio River Basin, (3) the Susquehanna River Basin, (4) the Potomac
River Basin, and (5) the Delaware River Basin.
Pennsylvania is a member of eight interstate organizations and one international organization. The
interstate organizations are the (1) Delaware River Basin Commission, (2) Delaware Estuary Program,
(3) Susquehanna River Basin Commission, (4) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, (5)
Chesapeake Bay Program, (6) Ohio River Basin Commission, (7) Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation
Commission, and (8) Great Lakes Commission. The international organization is the Great Lakes Water
Quality Board of the International Joint Commission.
A brief description of each interstate organization and program follows:
(1) Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC)
Members: Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware and the United States Government
Purpose: This interstate compact, established October 27, 1961, manages the water resources within
the Delaware River Basin through programs relating to water supply, pollution control, flood
protection, watershed management, recreation, hydroelectric power, regulation of withdrawals and
diversions, intergovernmental relations, and capital financing.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 8
(2) Delaware Estuary Program (DELEP)
Members: Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, USEPA, and the Partnership for the Delaware
Estuary, Inc.
Purpose: The purpose of this program, established in 1988, is to implement the recommendations in
the September 1996 Management Plan for the Delaware Estuary to protect and restore the living
resources of the estuary while maintaining the economic vitality of the region by (1) restoring the fish
and wildlife of the Estuary and protecting their habitats; (2) reducing and controlling point and
nonpoint sources of pollution to attain water quality conditions necessary to support fish and wildlife;
(3) managing water allocations to protect public water supplies and maintain ecological conditions in
the Estuary for fish and wildlife; (4) managing the economic growth of the Estuary in accordance with
the goal of restoring and protecting the living resources of the Estuary; and (5) promoting greater
public understanding of the Estuary and greater participation in decisions and programs affecting the
Estuary.
(3) Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC)
Members: Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, and United States Government
Purpose: This interstate compact, established January 23, 1971, manages the water resources of the
Susquehanna River basin, including the receiving waters of the Chesapeake Bay, through programs
relating to water supply, water quality management and control, flood protection, watershed
management, recreation, other public values, hydroelectric power, withdrawals and diversions,
intergovernmental relations and capital financing.
(4) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (ICPRB)
Members: Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, District of Columbia, United States
Government
Purpose: This nonregulatory interstate compact, established July 11, 1940, was created to address
water quality and related land resource issues in the basin and to enhance, protect and conserve the
Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate cooperation.
(5) Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP)
Members: Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, District of Columbia, Chesapeake Bay Commission (a
tri-state legislative organization), USEPA
Purpose: In an agreement signed in 1983, and amended in 1987 and 1992, the six members (a)
agreed to a cooperative approach to protecting the Chesapeake Bay and to restoring it to a more
productive state, (b) established goals and priority commitments for Living Resources; Water Quality;
Population and Growth and Development; Public Information, Education and Participation; and
Governance; and (c) established specific mechanisms for coordination of this effort.
(6) Ohio River Basin Commission (ORBC)

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 9
Members: Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, West
Virginia
Purpose: Established in 1971, this nonregulatory commission (a) provides a forum to discuss, study
and develop regional policies and positions on common interstate issues concerning water and related
land resources; (b) coordinates, to the extent possible and appropriate, water and related land
resources planning in the basin and encourages coordinated and cooperative action by the member
states, the federal government and other agencies in the planning, development and management of
water and related resources in the basin; (c) provides representation of the regional interests of the
basin before Congress and federal agencies responsible for the planning, development and
management of water and related land resources in the basin; and (d) investigates, studies and reviews
water-related problems and issues of interest to the member states.
(7) Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO)
Members: Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, New York, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, United
States Government
Purpose: This interstate compact, established June 30, 1948, has regulatory and enforcement
authority for improving and maintaining Ohio River water quality and carries out a variety of
programs to identify pollution problems in the basin, monitor water quality conditions of the river,
and regulate wastewater discharges to the river through the establishment of pollution control
standards.
(8) Great Lakes Commission (GLC)
Members: Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Wisconsin, plus
observers (United States and Canadian federal agencies; Provincial, regional, tribal groups)
Purpose: This interstate compact was established December 12, 1955, and was granted the consent
of Congress on July 24, 1968. Through joint or cooperative action, the Commission (a) promotes the
orderly, integrated and comprehensive development, use and conservation of the water resources of
the Basin as a whole as well as for those portions of the Basin which may have problems of special
concern; (b) makes it possible for the Basin states to derive the maximum benefit from the use of new
or proposed public works, in the form of navigational aids or otherwise; (c) provides advice in
securing and maintaining a proper balance among industrial, commercial, agricultural, water supply,
residential, recreational and other legitimate uses of the Basin’s water resources; and (d) establishes
and maintains an intergovernmental agency so that the purposes of the compact may be accomplished
more effectively.
In addition to its membership on interstate organizations, Pennsylvania also participates in the
activities of the following international organization:
International Joint Commission (IJC)
Members: United States and Canada

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 10
Purpose: The IJC was established as part of the 1909 Boundary Waters Treaty between the United
States and Canada to prevent and resolve disputes between the two countries under the Treaty and to
pursue the common good of both countries as an independent and objective advisor. The
Commission has established over 20 boards to help it carry out its responsibilities, including the Great
Lakes Water Quality Board (of which Pennsylvania is a member). The Board is the principal advisor
to the Commission with regard to its functions, powers and responsibilities in carrying out the 1972
Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (and subsequent amendments).
PADEP’s Office for River Basin Cooperation coordinates Pennsylvania’s input to these commissions
and programs and develops strategies to utilize established commissions and like organizations as
vehicles to advance partnerships. This Office encourages and promotes multi-state cooperation to
solve common water resources problems. It ensures the implementation of the policies of the
Commonwealth in a consistent manner; links economic progress, watershed management, and
sustainability; and strengthens both the relationships and visibility of PADEP with these organizations
and the communities they serve. PADEP program staff also serve on various committees of these
organizations to address and/or to help formulate positions on issues.
In addition to the roles played by PADEP’s Office for River Basin Cooperation and program staff,
Section 93.2(b) of PADEP’s Water Quality Standards regulations specifies, “Where interstate or
international agencies under an interstate compact or international agreement establish water quality
standards regulations applicable to the waters of the Commonwealth, including wetlands, more
stringent than those in this title, the more stringent apply.” At this time, this Section is only applicable
to ORSANCO, DRBC and the IJC because of their water quality standards rulemaking authority.
For more information about PADEP’s Office of River Basin Cooperation and the eight interstate
organizations, visit PADEP’s website (http://
www.dep.state.pa.us). For more information about the
IJC, visit the Commission’s website (www.ijc.org).
4. Volunteer Monitoring
a. Pennsylvania encourages and supports volunteer monitoring as an integral part of
comprehensive statewide water quality protection. PADEP has established a Citizens’
Volunteer Monitoring Program recognizing that (1) volunteers can supplement government
monitoring programs particularly by providing information immediately following a storm,
(2) resource agencies can more effectively manage and protect PA’s aquatic resources with
the active, positive cooperation of an educated public, and (3) developing a quality assurance
and control plan can help ensure that the information collected by volunteers is useful, and the
time spent is worthwhile.
The Department has an ongoing program to provide support and technical assistance to
volunteer monitoring efforts. Involvement of individuals and organizations in monitoring
water quality of streams, lakes and rivers enables them to become active participants in
watershed programs and activities. Volunteer monitoring can create an informed constituency
that understands the power and limitations of scientific information. Over 140 groups that
include 11,000 individuals are involved statewide in monitoring activities. More than 3,000
sampling stations are utilized. Program goals include:

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 11
Fostering stewardship by helping communities find the tools needed to know water
resources better.
Giving the Department a better understanding of water resources by receiving quality
assured data from volunteers.
In two years the program provided over 50 workshops, training and quality assurance sessions
for volunteer monitors throughout the state. It has also prepared a draft technical handbook
that includes a study design process, numerous “surveys” for monitoring at differing levels of
expertise and a volunteer monitoring code of ethics. The handbook outlines a “study design”
process. In this process, monitors define goals and identify data users for their programs.
The handbook also contains “surveys” or monitoring packages for defined goals. About half
of the 20 surveys could lead volunteers into the 305(b)/303(d) process. The CVMP will hold
a training session in the Year 2000 for volunteers who want to collect data for the
305(b)/303(d) process.
The program produces a statewide newsletter, directory of volunteer monitoring groups,
factsheets and other educational materials. A volunteer environmental monitoring panel has
met over the last twoyears and is now beginning to build a statewide network to support and
guide volunteer monitoring efforts in the state. The first statewide summit of volunteer
monitors was planned and implemented by the program in 1999.
The program in collaboration with the Delaware River Basin Commission plans and
implements an annual statewide water quality snapshot. Thousands of volunteers collect
water quality data at their routine sampling stations during a ten-day period in April. The
program compiles the data into a report that can be used as an educational tool.
For more details, visit PADEP’s website at http://
www.dep.state.pa.us or contact PADEP’s
Citizens’ Volunteer Monitoring Coordinator, Bureau of Watershed Conservation, 717-787-
3730.
b. Pennsylvania Senior Environment Corps
On May 16, 1997, a Letter of Intent was signed by the PA Departments of Environmental
Protection and Aging and the Environmental Alliance for Senior Involvement to organize a
Senior Environment Corps in Pennsylvania to (a) educate the public about water quality and
other environmental concerns, (b) build confidence in water quality monitoring as an
important link in PA’s watershed management approach, and (c) inspire even greater citizen
activity in protecting and enhancing Pennsylvania’s environment. To date, over 200 older
Pennsylvanians have been recruited and trained to monitor waterways in and around their
communities, ten pilot monitoring sites have been organized to provide the foundation for
long-term senior environmental volunteer activities, and an innovative statewide pilot database
and training materials have been developed and made available on the Internet.
The following documents provide additional information on volunteer water quality
monitoring in Pennsylvania.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 12
Title: Designing Your Monitoring Program. A Technical Handbook for Community-Based
Monitoring in Pennsylvania
Description: Technical handbook that includes a study design process, numerous “surveys”
for monitoring at different levels of expertise and a volunteer monitoring code of ethics. The
handbook also provides specific guidance for volunteers who wish their data to be used by the
Department in screening or assessment in the 305(b)/303(d) process.
Document Code: 3900-BK-DEP2140 (8/97)
Title: Statewide Directory of Citizens’ Volunteer Monitoring Programs
Description: This directory, based on responses to a DEP survey, is a compilation of 63
groups actively monitoring surface and groundwater resources in the Commonwealth. The
groups include 23 Watershed Associations, 13 Schools/Universities/Education Centers,
6 Alliances/Conservancies, 6 Conservation Districts, 4 National Affiliations, 3 State-related
Organizations, and 8 Other Organizations (Trusts, Authorities, Planning Commissions, etc.).
The directory includes a profile sheet of each group that responded to the survey and includes
information on the (1) subbasin, type of waterbody and parameters they monitor; (2) group
affiliations; (3) data uses; (4) funding; (5) group size; and (6) program coordinators.
Title: Water Quality Monitoring of Pennsylvania Streams by Citizen Groups - A Primer in
Quality Assurance and Quality Control
Description: This guide (1) is designed to aid groups, organizations, schools, and individuals
in developing a quality assurance/quality control plan for their stream monitoring efforts; (2) is
intended primarily for conducting monitoring that is not part of a scientific or legal
investigation; (3) addresses both biological and chemical monitoring; and (4) deals primarily
with field sampling procedures.
C. Program Funding
The following is a discussion of the state agencies receiving USEPA grants, identifying the grant source,
responsible bureau, grant period, funding level and purpose:
1. PADEP (Office of Water Management)
a. Section 106 Water Pollution Control Program Grant
Responsible Bureau: Water Quality Protection
Grant Period: 10/1/98 - 9/30/99, recurring, periodic
Funding Level: $2,860,527, state match $4,963,523
Purpose: To provide annual assistance to the state in implementing its water pollution control
program
b. Section 104(g)(1) Operator Outreach Training Grant
Responsible Bureau: Water Supply Management

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 13
Grant Periods: 10/1/96 - 9/30/99; 10/1/98 - 9/30/99 (Two grants), recurring, periodic
Funding Levels: $119,500; $40,000 ($159,500 total), 25% state match
Purpose: To provide onsite technical assistance and training and training videos for wastewater
treatment plant operators
c. Section 205(g) Construction Management Assistance Grant
Responsible Bureau: Water Supply Management
Grant Period: 10/1/98 - 9/30/99, recurring, periodic
Funding Level: $305,416, no state match required
Purpose: To provide program funding for managing the federally delegated and related state
sewerage construction grants programs and funded projects.
d. Section 205(j)(1) Water Quality Management Planning Grant
Responsible Bureau: Watershed Conservation
Grant Period: 10/1/98 - 9/30/99, recurring, periodic
Funding Level: $834,692, no state match required
Purpose: To conduct priority waterbody surveys and assessments of unassessed waters and to
provide funding for program management.
e. Section 104(b)(3) NPDES Related State Program Grant
Responsible Bureau: Various (Liaison: Office of Water Management)
Grant Periods: 7/17/95 - 11/30/99; 9/1/96 - 12/31/99; 3/12/97 - 9/30/99; 8/15/98-10/31/00 (Four
grants), recurring, periodic
Funding Levels: $314,640; $604,547; $337,170; $311,760 ($1,568,117 total), no state match
required
Purpose: To provide funding for 28 watershed-related activities to address water quality impacts
under the NPDES program.
f. Section 117 Chesapeake Bay Program Grant
Responsible Bureau: Water Quality Protection
Grant Periods: 7/1/97 - 12/30/99; 7/1/98 - 6/30/00 (Two grants), recurring, periodic
Funding Levels: $2,884,270; $2,720,615 ($5,604,885 total), 50% state match
Purpose: To provide funding for program management and implementation, Best Management
Practices cost sharing, and for various projects and activities to reduce the nutrient and sediment
loads from PA to the Chesapeake Bay.
g. Section 319(h) NPS Implementation Grant
Responsible Bureau: Watershed Conservation
Grant Periods: 2/21/95 - 9/30/98; 3/21/96 - 6/30/00; 2/10/97 - 12/30/99;
11/1/97 - 10/31/99; 10/1/98 - 9/30/01 (Five grants), recurring, competitive
Funding Levels: $2,738,948; $2,902,680; $2,927,541; $3,073,918; $2,935,500 (40% state match)

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 14
Purpose: To provide funding for program management and implementation and for various
watershed assessments and restoration projects and other activities to address water quality problems
caused by nonpoint sources of pollution.
h. Section 104 Miscellaneous Studies/Surveys Grant
Responsible Bureau: Watershed Conservation
Grant Period: 11/17/97 - 9/30/99, annual, periodic
Funding Level: $200,000, no state match required
Purpose: to provide funding for sampling and assessment (for use impairment) of 100-200
unassessed “Significant” lakes in PA.
i. Section 104 Wetland Protection State Development Grant
Responsible Bureau: Watershed Conservation
Grant Periods: 10/1/94 - 9/30/99; 7/28/97 - 6/30/00 (Two grants), annual, competitive
Funding Levels: $81,863; $349,000 ($430,863 total), 25% match
Purpose: To provide funding to develop a watershed-based Wetlands Protection Program, to
enhance the wetlands database, and to develop and implement wetlands protection and management
strategies for the Tunkhannock Creek Watershed.
j. Watershed Restoration and Assistance Program (WRAP) Grant
Responsible Bureau: Watershed Conservation
Grant Periods: 7/1/98 - 6/30/99, 7/1/99 - 6/30/00, annual, competitive
Funding Level: $575,000; $575,000, all state funds
Purpose: To help “local partners” gain access to the skills and tools that will enable them to educate
the general public about nonpoint source pollution, develop action plans to solve nonpoint source
pollution problems and implement control projects that emphasize cooperative problem resolutions
and water quality improvement.
k. Environmental Education Grants
Responsible Bureau: Office of Policy and Communications
Grant Periods: July 1 of every year grant period opens for one or more years with time extensions
possible. First grant opened 7/93, annual, competitive
Funding Level: Yearly average of $300,000 in grants awarded with maximum of $10,000 per
contract.
Purpose: The Environmental Education (EE) Act of 1993, set aside 5% of the pollution fines and
penalties collected by DEP annually to stimulate environmental education in Pennsylvania.
2. PADEP (Office of Mineral Resources Management)
a. Section 104(b)(3) Watershed Assessment Grants
Responsible Bureau: Mining and Reclamation
Grant Periods: 9/11/96 - 9/30/99; 10/1/98 - 9/30/00 (Two grants), annual, periodic

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 15
Funding Levels: $538,046; $190,460 ($728,506 total), no state match required
Purpose: To provide funding for six acid mine drainage treatment demonstration projects and nine
watershed assessment and remediation technology demonstration projects.
3. PDA
a. Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act
Responsible Bureau: Plant Industry
Grant Periods: Annually since 1976; 10/1/99 - 9/30/00; annual and periodic
Funding Levels: Current year $767,800 federal, $241,284 state
Federal
State
Enforcement
85%
15%
Certification
50%
50%
Special Projects
85%
15%
Purpose: To provide funding for pesticide education, certification and enforcement and to educate
urban communities about the use of certified pesticide applicators and certified products.
The appropriate Responsible Bureau should be contacted for more detailed information on each of
the above grants.
4. Watershed Protection and Environmental Stewardship Fund (Growing Greener)
Responsible Agencies: Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR)
Department of Agriculture (PDA)
Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST)
Grant Period: 2000 to 2005
Funding Level: $650,000,000
Purpose: The Environmental Stewardship and Watershed Protection Act authorizes DEP to give grants
for: acid mine drainage abatement; mine cleanup efforts; abandoned oil and gas well plugging; improving
water-quality-impaired watersheds, including those polluted by past mining activities, agricultural and
urban runoff, atmospheric deposition, on-lot sewage systems, and earth moving activities; and improving
the state’s water and sewer infrastructure.
DCNR shall utilize funds for: state parks and state forest lands; greenways, trails, open space, river
corridors, etc.; and protecting and conserving biological diversity. PDA shall deposit the funds in the
Agricultural Conservation Easement Purchase Fund.
PENNVEST will provide financial assistance in the form of grants and matching grants for stormwater,
water and sewer infrastructure projects, including construction or rehabilitation of collection and
conveyance systems.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 16
D. Program Coordination Mechanisms
Staff meetings
1. Coordinating and advisory committees
a. Agricultural Advisory Board
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: To review and comment on proposed or existing Department regulations and
Department policies that either regulate or affect agriculture.
Authority/Mandate: S.B. 298, the Agricultural Advisory Board Act
b. Chesapeake Bay Advisory Committee to the State Conservation Commission
Organization Type: Secretary
Purpose: Advise the State Conservation Commission and DEP on how best to implement the
goals and objectives of the Pennsylvania’s Chesapeake Bay Program.
Authority/Mandate: None
c. Citizen’s Advisory Council
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: Council is broadly charged with reviewing the work of DEP, making recommendations
for its improvement, studying major environmental legislation. In addition, the Air Pollution
Control Act directs DEP to consult with the Council in implementing the Clean Air Act.
Authority/Mandate: Act 275 of 1970; Act 95 of 1992
d. Coastal Zone Advisory Committee
Organization Type: Executive Order
Purpose: To provide coordination between state agencies, commissions, offices, etc. that
administer and/or are affected by the administration of programs in the Commonwealth’s coastal
areas.
Authority/Mandate: Executive Order 1980-20
e. Dirt and Gravel Roads Quality Assurance Board Administrative Committee
Organization Type: Support/coordination for local Quality Assurance Boards
Purpose: State level committee to coordinate the county Quality Assurance Boards (QAB) that
are legislatively mandated. Each county has a four member QAB with two members appointed by
the conservation district, and one member appointed by the PA Fish & Boat Commission and one
by the Natural Resource Conservation Service. The local QAB decides which applicants get
funded and other important administrative functions.
Authority/Mandate: Act 3 of 1997 authorizes local QABs
f. Mining & Reclamation Advisory Board
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: To assist the Secretary of DEP to expend the funds for the purposes provided by the
Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act and to advise the Secretary on all matters
pertaining to mining and reclamation.
Authority/Mandate: Organized pursuant to Section 81(g) of the Pennsylvania Surface Mining
Conservation and Reclamation Act (Act 181 of 1984) as amended by Act 173 of 1992.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 17
g. Nutrient Management Advisory Board
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: Review and comment on all State Conservation Commission regulations and interim
criteria established under Section 4(4) of the Nutrient Management Act. Consult with the
Commission, the Department Agriculture, Cooperative Extension, conservation districts, and the
DEP on matters related to implementation.
Authority/Mandate: Section 8 of the Nutrient Management Act, Act 6 of 1993.
h. Oil & Gas Technical Advisory Board
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: To provide consultation on all oil and gas regulations of a technical nature prior to
submission to the Environmental Quality Board (EQB).
Authority/Mandate: Oil and Gas Act 223 of 1984 Section 216
i. Sewage Advisory Committee
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: To review proposed rules, regulations, standards and procedures and review existing
rules, regulations, standards and procedures under Act 537 and make recommendations to the
Secretary of the DEP regarding their review.
Authority/Mandate: Act 537, the Sewage Facilities Act
j. Small Water System Technical Assistance Center Board
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: The Board is to direct administration of the Technical Assistance Center. The role of
the TAC is to give the DEP advice on developing the small systems technical and management
assistance program; to act as a clearinghouse to coordinate ongoing training between state
agencies, local governments, and authorities and water industry associations; and to comment on
policies and regulations as they affect small water systems.
Authority/Mandate: This Board is authorized and organized pursuant to Section 6(B) of the
Pennsylvania Small Water Systems Assistance Act (Act 5-1992)
k. State Board for Certification of Sewage Enforcement Officers
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: To administer examinations, certify successful examiners, implement biennial renewals,
and hold hearings and issue adjudications on SEO appeals of actions of the Department.
Authority/Mandate: Pennsylvania Sewage Facilities Act – Act of 1965, P>L> 1535, No. 537, as
amended.
l. State Board for Certification of Sewage Treatment Plant Operators & Wastewater Operators
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: Certify by examination of Sewage Treatment Plant and Waterworks Operators.
Authority/Mandate: Act 322 of November 18, 1968, “The Certification Act for Sewage
Treatment Plant and Waterworks Operators.”
m. State Conservation Commission
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: The purpose of the Commission is the conservation of soil, water and related resources
of the Commonwealth, and for the control and prevention of soil erosion, and thereby to preserve

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 18
natural resources; assist in the control of floods; prevent impairment of dams and reservoirs; assist
in maintaining the navigability of rivers and harbors; preserve wildlife; preserve the tax base;
protect public lands; and protect and promote the health, safety and general welfare of the people
of the Commonwealth.
Authority/Mandate: Act 217 of 1945 as amended (1986)
n. Storage Tank Advisory Committee
Organization Type: Statute
Purpose: The Department shall consult with the Advisory Committee in the formulation, drafting
and presentation of all regulations promulgated under the Storage Tank and Spill Prevention Act.
Authority/Mandate: Section 105 of the Storage Tank and Spill Prevention Act.
o. Water Resources Advisory Committee
Organization Type: Secretary
Purpose: To provide technical advise to DEP on the environmental, economic and other social
impacts of existing, new or proposed regulations, policies, and control techniques or technologies
affecting water resources management including surface/ground water quality and quantity issues.
Authority/Mandate: Secretary of the Department
p. Wetlands Protection Advisory Committee
Organization Type: Secretary
Purpose: To assist the Department in the development and review of legislation, regulations,
policies and other initiatives affecting the Commonwealth’s wetland reserve.
Authority/Mandate: Secretary of the Department
2. Ad hoc committees
a. Nonpoint Source Liaison Workgroup:
Purpose: The primary goal of the workgroup is to provide input into Pennsylvania’s Nonpoint
Source State Management Program. Smaller workgroups within the liaison committee each focus
on one of the following nonpoint source categories: resource extraction, agriculture,
construction/urban runoff, silviculture, land disposal (onlot sewage systems) and
hydromodification.
b. Nonpoint Source Task Force:
Purpose: The Task Force is to recommend direction for the NPS Pollution Prevention and
Management Program in Pennsylvania; formulate and recommend Department policy on critical
nonpoint source issues; insure inter-bureau and inter-agency coordination in addressing NPS
pollution; create and promote public awareness of NPS pollution solutions; and assist in the
evaluation and selection of Section 319 Grant proposals for funding.
E. Public participation processes
PADEP public participation activities, as they relate to actions undertaken with respect to the nine federal
Continuing Planning Process elements, are grounded in the public participation requirements of the federal
Clean Water Act, in applicable PA environmental statutes, and in specific program regulations and policies.
PADEP applies a philosophy of providing broad public participation opportunities in all of its activities. The
Department’s Office of Policy oversees the public participation process with each program area providing the
information to be public noticed in the Pennsylvania Bulletin and the DEP UPDATE, and posted on the DEP

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 19
website. Please refer to the DEP website at: www.dep.state.pa.us, choose public participation for a very
comprehensive and detailed journey through our public participation process. Most notably, the Department
has established a website and is using other Internet tools such as Usenet groups and e-mail as part of its
program to actively encourage public participation in agency decision-making and to make PADEP more
“user friendly”. The Department’s award-winning site on the World Wide Web (
http://www.dep.state.pa.us
)
provides, among other things, access to a wide variety of department policies and guidance documents, lists
of opportunities for public participation, up-to-date environmental news and links to other Internet sites of
related interest. The Department believes the use of Internet tools enhances the ability of citizens to
participate in government, improves Department service to the public, expands opportunities for
environmental education and reduces costs to the taxpayers. The Department also issues a weekly newsletter,
the
Environmental Protection Update
, which serves as another important link to Department activities for
the public.
The Department also sponsors and supports a wide variety of advisory committees that provide opportunities
for public and special interest input to program development and implementation. One such committee, the
Citizens Advisory Council, which advises the Department on a wide variety of environmental programs and
issues, has five designated seats on the Environmental Quality Board, the entity responsible for promulgating
state environmental regulations. Another advisory committee important to PA’s water quality management
program is the Water Resources Advisory Committee which provides input to PADEP on proposed
regulations, technical guidance documents and manuals and other water-related policies and issues. The
committee includes representatives with technical expertise from business and industry, environmental
advocacy groups and public interest groups. Committee comments must accompany any proposed water
program regulations presented by PADEP to the Environmental Quality Board for promulgation. The
Agricultural Advisory Committee provides input and advice to PADEP on water quality and other program
regulation and policies that affect agricultural practices and businesses.
In addition to the Pennsylvania Bulletin public notice requesting public comments, the notice in DEP’s
UPDATE, the posting on DEP’s website and the advisory committees, Public Participation in the
Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance (Document Code: 012-1920-001) describes the
following methods of obtaining Public Input:
1. Use of Advisory Committees
2. Use of the Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Procedure
3. Use of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Procedure
4. Use of the Advanced Notice of Final Rulemaking Procedure
5. Public Information Meetings
6. Public Hearings
7. Regulatory Negotiation
8. Six-Month Regulatory Agenda
9. Sunset Review
Public participation procedures can be found in a number of general guidance documents such as Document
Code 012-1920-001, Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance and
Document Code 012-0100-001, Environmental Quality Board Policy for Processing Petitions. More
program-specific requirements can be found in the environmental protection statutes implemented by
PADEP, in program regulations, in delegation agreements and in program-specific technical guidance
documents.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 20
DEP’s new webpage eF.A.C.T.S. will increase public environmental awareness and give constituents a means
to judge the agency’s performance on individual cases.
The Environment, Facility, Application, Compliance Tracking System (eF.A.C.T.S.) is a comprehensive
system for managing regulated facilities. eF.A.C.T.S. provides multi-media data about a regulated client, site
or facility. The DEP data model was one of the models used by the Environmental Council of the States
(ECOS) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop a common data model
known as Facility Identification Template for States (FITS). This core Client/Site data structure is used by
environmental programs in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and supports the integrated functionality of
Application Processing, Compliance and Bonding.
In the application processing module, all permit applications and issued permits are linked to a department
wide client and site record. Using the Client/Site structures, the compliance module provides cross-program
functionality to record and track inspections, violations, enforcement actions and penalties. This information
is also posted to the Pennsylvania DEP Website, allowing citizens and the regulated community to readily
access information regarding environmental laws and the compliance of DEP-regulated facilities. The
Council of State Governments selected the DEP Compliance Reporting System as one of 1999’s eight most
innovative programs.
Additional eF.A.C.T.S. modules include program-specific inventory details (Water Quality, Radiation
Protection, Hazardous Waste, Municipal/Residual Waste, Oil and Gas Management, Mining and
Reclamation), bonding, forfeitures, licensing and self-monitoring functionality. The client/site module
interfaces with DEP’s Geospatial Information Systems.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 21
Section II - Implementation of the CPP Elements
A.
Element 1 - Process for developing effluent limitations and schedules of compliance at least as
stringent as those required by Sections 301(b)(1) and (2), 306 and 307, and at least as stringent as any
requirements contained in applicable water quality standards in effect under authority of Section 303
of the Act
The development and specification of effluent limitations in NPDES permits must be done in a manner
consistent with the provisions of Chapters 91, 92, 93, 95, 97, 101, 102 and 105 of PADEP’s rules and
regulations, EPA’s NPDES Program Regulations (40 CFR 122-125); EPA’s Effluent Limitation Guidelines
(40 CFR 400-473); Sections 301(b)(1) and (2), 303, 306 and 307 of the federal Clean Water Act; and
applicable State and EPA policies and guidance. NPDES permit requirements must also conform to
applicable regulatory standards of river basin commissions such as the Delaware River Basin Commission
(DRBC), the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), and the International Joint
Commission (IJC) which may be more stringent or restrictive.
There are several different types of effluent limitations that may be specified in NPDES permits.
1. Technology-based limitations represent the basic minimum degree of treatment that must be achieved by
all dischargers on a nationwide basis as defined in Section 301 of the Clean Water Act. Chapters 95 and
97 of PADEP’s regulations also define technology-based treatment requirements for various discharge
situations.
2. Water quality-based limitations are those that are necessary to meet state water quality standards and are
generally determined through the application of a water quality model. They are developed on a case-by-
case basis, depending on the location and type of discharge and receiving stream characteristics. In
addition, the effluent limitations for discharges to High Quality and Exceptional Value waters must
comply with the antidegradation requirements in Chapters 92, 93, 95, 102 and 105 of PADEP’s
regulations.
3. Effluent standards represent uniform effluent quality requirements for certain types of discharge
situations. Effluent standards are generally used by interstate river basin commissions such as DRBC and
ORSANCO as one method of specifying minimum degrees of treatment required as part of their
respective basin management plans. Chapters 95 and 97 of PADEP’s regulations also specify effluent
standards to be achieved by certain types of discharges.
4. Best Management Practices (BMPs) as effluent limitations. Narrative BMPs which are properly
designed, implemented, and maintained constitute effluent limitations for various stormwater discharges
associated with industrial activities, including stormwater discharges associated with construction
activity.
In summary, effluent limitations in NPDES permits must reflect the more stringent of the above
requirements, as applicable. For more detailed information on the development of technology-based and
water quality-based effluent limitations, refer to Chapters 2 and 3, respectively, in the document,
“Technical Guidance for the Development and Specification of Effluent Limitations and Other Permit
Conditions in NPDES Permits”.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 22
Applicable deadlines for achieving compliance (i.e., schedules for compliance) with effluent limitation
requirements are dependent upon the type of discharger involved.
1. New Dischargers and New Sources
NPDES permit requirements for new dischargers and new sources are effective immediately upon
issuance of the permit. The discharger must achieve the governing effluent limitations upon
commencement of discharge.
2. Existing Unpermitted Dischargers
Existing dischargers who have never received valid NPDES permits are treated as new dischargers. The
governing effluent limitations must be achieved immediately upon issuance of the permit. A consent
order and agreement (COA) or Department order must be used to resolve the permittee’s
non-compliance status.
3. Existing Permitted Dischargers
Existing permitted dischargers whose permits are being reissued, modified or revoked and reissued, are
subject to the more stringent of technology-based limits, water quality -based limits or previous NPDES
permit requirements.
a. Technology-based requirements are effective immediately upon permit issuance (unless USEPA
regulations provide for a later compliance deadline). If the permittee cannot meet these effluent
limitations on their effective date, a separate COA or Department order may be developed to resolve
the permittee’s non-compliance status. The Consent Order and Agreement provides a schedule for
implementation and compliance for the permittee to meet all technology-based requirements.
b. Water quality-based effluent limitations being continued from the existing NPDES permit are effective
upon the date of permit reissuance or modification. If the permittee cannot meet these effluent
limitations on their effective date, a COA or Department order may be developed to resolve the
permittee’s non-compliance status. The Consent Order and Agreement provides a schedule for
implementation and compliance for the permittee to meet all water quality-based effluent limits for the
NPDES permit.
c. New water quality-based effluent limitations and carry over parameters with more stringent water
quality-based effluent limitations than previously permitted are effective upon the date of permit
issuance. If the permittee cannot meet these effluent limitations on their effective date, a COA or
Department order may be developed to resolve the permittee’s non-compliance status.
References: Technical Guidance for the Development and Specification of Effluent Limitations and
Other Permit Conditions in NPDES Permits (Document code 362-0400-001); Water Quality Toxics
Management Strategy (Document code 361-0100-003)

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 23
B.
Element 2 - Process for incorporating elements of any applicable areawide waste treatment plans
under Section 208 and applicable basin plans under Section 209 of the Act
Pennsylvania’s early efforts at areawide water quality management planning occurred under the federal Water
Pollution Control Act of 1965, in which states were required to develop water quality standards for navigable
waters. Pennsylvania divided the state into 20 water quality standards hearing areas, each of which roughly
corresponded to a hydrologic unit. For each hearing area, water uses were identified and water quality
criteria to protect the uses were developed. An implementation plan involving the regulation of Biochemical
Oxygen Demand (BOD), ammonia, phosphorus and other non-toxic parameters was developed. During this
planning process, the Department’s Basin Engineers developed what turned out to be the first set of
watershed Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in Pennsylvania. This became apparent retrospectively
when in 1975-76, the implementation plans, in updated form, were submitted to USEPA in fulfillment of the
mandate for each state to develop basin plans under Section 303(e) of the 1972 federal Water Pollution
Control Act. In fact, these plans were referred to as “phased TMDLs.” There is no record that USEPA ever
acted upon these plan submittals. For almost ten years, the implementation plans were used as the basis for
the issuance of permits under the Pennsylvania Clean Streams Law, and then for reissuance of the same
permits under the NPDES program.
The 1972 federal Act contained many new planning requirements and provisions. One of these was the
development and submittal of basin plans under Section 303(e). Another was the requirement for the
development of TMDLs in watersheds that were not meeting water quality standards. Still another was an
authorization to develop “Level B” water resource plans under Section 209 of the Act. However, USEPA’s
emphasis on water quality management planning was eventually focused on Section 208 planning
requirements. Under Section 208, states were encouraged to designate areawide waste treatment
management planning agencies, who would then have three years in which to develop areawide waste
treatment plans which would address a whole spectrum of potential water quality management issues,
including the identification of treatment works needed to meet municipal and industrial needs for the next
twenty years, the establishment of construction priorities, the establishment of regulatory programs, the
identification of needed management agencies to finance, construct, and operate the waste treatment works,
and finally processes to identify and control agricultural, silviculture, mining, construction, irrigation and
residual waste related sources of pollution. Under Section 208, once areawide plans were developed,
certified by the Governor, and approved by USEPA, all NPDES permits and all federal treatment plant
construction grants were to be issued and awarded in accordance with the plan.
The release of Section 208 funds for planning that were authorized and appropriated by Congress was
delayed for four years until the U.S. Supreme Court ordered their release. In the interim, Pennsylvania, in
1973, began a Comprehensive Water Quality Management Planning (COWAMP) program of its own using
funds from a state bond issue. The state was divided into nine study areas and consultants were hired to
conduct detailed studies that covered environmental, technical, economic, social and resource management
aspects of water quality management in each study area. The study activities included a high level of public
participation, analysis of environmental futures and an interdisciplinary approach to study area needs.
Consistency among the studies was addressed by the preparation of standardized study methodologies at the
outset, including computer models for economic/financial analysis and water quality simulation. The
program objective was to select a combination of actions and policies in each study area that would achieve
and maintain water quality in a manner that would be economically sound and consistent with state and study
area environmental objectives. When Section 208 funds eventually became available in 1976, they were
directed toward support of the COWAMP program. As each COWAMP/208 plan was completed, it was

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 24
certified by the Governor and submitted to USEPA for approval as updates to the state CPP. USEPA
conditionally approved the first two plans, but no response was ever received on the remainder. As the water
quality management plans were completed, they became the basis for the state water pollution control
program operations and decisions. Section 201 delineations, treatment plant regionalization orders,
construction grant awards and permit limits were to be based on the plans.
Public Participation was a basic element of the state’s 208 planning process. Each of the nine COWAMP
study areas had a committee structure (Policy Advisory, Study Advisory, and Technical Advisory) to provide
a forum for public participation during the water quality management plan development process. The
COWAMP committees met regularly to provide input on issues that needed to be addressed, to review draft-
planning documents prepared by study area consultants and to recommend plan changes. A state-wide public
participation coordinator was also employed to provide consultation to the individual study area public
participation programs, evaluate the effectiveness of the public participation effort, develop materials to aid
the program and to assure that public input to the planning process was used for enhancement of the plans.
As federal emphasis on and funding for Section 208 planning phased out, other planning activities served as
supplements to the Section 208 plans, including facilities plans required in the federal construction grants
program and municipal sewage management plans required by the PA Sewage Facilities Act. Other recent
and ongoing planning efforts that continue to supplement the earlier planning efforts are discussed in Element
4 below.
References: Clean Streams Law, PA Sewage Facilities Act, 25 PA Code Chapter 71, 25 PA Code
Chapter 93.
C.
Element 3 - Process for developing total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and individual water quality
based limitations for pollutants in accordance with Section 303(d) of the Act and Section 130.7(a) of
this Regulation
PADEP has an ongoing program to assess the quality of waters in PA. Water bodies that do not meet water
quality standards are identified as impaired. Section 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act requires states to
further evaluate impaired waters to determine which waters would still not meet water quality standards even
after the appropriate required water pollution control technology has been applied and to include those
waters on a list of impaired waters. The 303(d) list includes the reason for impairment, which may be one or
more point and/or nonpoint sources. As a follow-up to the listing, a TMDL must be developed for each
waterbody on the list. The TMDL is designed so that the waterbody will meet the water quality standards
when it is put into place.
PADEP is using a watershed management approach for developing TMDLs and individual water quality
based effluent limitations.
The Department’s plan for achieving comprehensive (statewide) assessment of its surface waters includes
implementation of a program to evaluate all unassessed free-flowing streams by the end of the year 2003.
The Department has developed a strategy for these assessments which involves preliminary screening of each
watershed followed by a field-level biological assessment. The goal is to evaluate unassessed free-flowing
streams in Pennsylvania to identify NPS impacts, lesser known PS impacts, combined NPS/PS impacts, and
to protect unassessed waters that are found to be of high quality or exceptional value.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 25
This process uses a biological screening protocol to establish whether aquatic life uses are impaired or not
impaired. Where uses are found to be impaired or where the screening does not yield definitive information,
more detailed assessments will be conducted to identify the NPS and/or PS responsible for the problem so
that remediation plans can be developed or other appropriate actions can be initiated. The information
obtained from this effort can also be used in 305(b) assessments and to help identify areas that require Total
Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) calculations and to establish priorities for TMDL development.
An initial desktop analysis and prioritization was completed at the State Water Plan Watershed level. Each
watershed was identified as high, medium, or low priority - depending on the potential for NPS pollution.
Information from the existing 305(b) assessment database, an agricultural pollution potential index developed
by Penn State University, groundwater programs and relative loadings for various land uses was used in this
initial prioritization. The relative loadings database has been developed by Penn State University using
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and information from the DEP fixed station Water Quality
Network, the point source discharge database and data collected from the Department’s atmospheric
deposition monitoring network.
Starting with the high priority State Water Plan Watersheds, smaller “assessment unit” watersheds were
delineated within each of the 104 State Water Plan Watersheds. These assessment units average 50 square
miles in size, and are mapped at the 1:24,000 scale.
Information on land cover, land uses, atmospheric deposition, abandoned mine drainage, water quality
(collected by the Department and other agencies), and known PS discharges within each assessment unit was
used to identify known and potential sources of pollution. Recent assessments completed during ongoing
monitoring and assessment activities were also considered so that, where possible, assessments are not
duplicated.
Each assessment unit was identified as having a low, medium, or high potential for NPS impact for purposes
of field work. Assessment priorities were established as a cooperative effort between various divisions within
the Bureau of Watershed Conservation (BWC). Generally, those watersheds having the greatest number of
miles potentially impaired were given the highest priority and the 1997 field work was done in these areas.
The 1998 field work focus was watersheds with a high potential for containing unimpaired water quality.
Within each high and medium priority assessment unit, a prescreening reconnaissance is conducted on all
subwatersheds. The purposes of this field effort are to familiarize the investigator with the unit and its land
use patterns, to preliminarily site sampling locations and to attempt to aggregate subwatersheds having
similar physical habitat and land use characteristics so that only one representative subwatershed needs to be
samples.
Biological screening is conducted on wadeable waters using a modification of EPA’s Rapid Bioassessment
Protocol (RBP I), which includes field identification of benthic macroinvertebrates to the family level and an
RBP habitat assessment. Each biological screening results in an Assessment Summary for input to the 305(b)
assessment database that identifies waters with obvious water quality impairment and those with no obvious
impairment. Outside data is also reviewed. If the data is used, it must be in the correct format. . Volunteer
provided data sets that could not be used on the 303(d) list were sent to the appropriate regional offices of
DEP for their possible use in screening or prioritizing of watersheds for assessment. Acceptable data sets
from five outside organizations were included in the year 2000 305(b) report/303(d) list.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 26
All data are compiled into one master report - the Water Quality Assessment 305(b) Report. Most stream
reaches that are impaired on the 305(b) report are incorporated into the 303(d) list, which is a subset of the
305(b) report. Impaired stream reaches that are under compliance orders or have two to three proven
BMP’s in place are not moved to the 303(d) list. When it does occur, EPA is sent detailed documentation.
A determination of impairment in 9 out of 10 streams triggers a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) which
is the allocation of pollution loading and then a reduction of the load. Another possibility is to have
volunteers supply chemical data when a TMDL is triggered
A TMDL can be considered to be a watershed budget for pollutants, representing the total amount of
pollutants that can be assimilated by a stream without causing impairment or water quality standards to be
exceeded. The maximum allowable amount of a specific pollutant is allocated to all sources in the watershed,
including point source discharges from sewage treatment plants and industrial wastewater facilities (point
source wasteload allocation) and polluted runoff from the land (nonpoint source load allocation). A margin
of safety is also provided to account for uncertainty in the loading calculations. The resulting pollutant
allocations constitute the amount of pollutants that can be discharged into a waterway from each category.
The TMDL does not specify how dischargers must attain a particular load reduction.
Point source wasteload allocations are implemented through existing state regulations under the NPDES
permit program. These permits set effluent limitations on the amount of pollutants that can be discharged.
Refer to Section II, Element 1 above for more detailed information on establishing effluent limitations.
Nonpoint source load allocations are implemented through a combination of federal, state and local
programs, which include regulatory, nonregulatory and voluntary efforts. The focus is on implementation of
remedial efforts that will restore and maintain healthy waterways. A phased approach detailed in a
remediation plan concentrates on identifying sources of impairment and implementing corrective work based
on best available data and information. Additional monitoring and data collection will occur to track
progress and better characterize pollutant sources, loadings and the effectiveness of control measures.
Additional remedial work will be scheduled if initial measures have not restored waters to meet uses.
When PA has no instream criteria for the pollutants of concern in a TMDL, a reference watershed is used to
set allowable loading rates in the affected watersheds. The reference watershed approach is used to estimate
the necessary loading reduction of pollutants such as phosphorus and sediment that would be needed to
restore a healthy aquatic community and allow the streams in the watershed to achieve their designated uses.
The reference watershed approach is based on selecting a non-impaired watershed with similar land use
characteristics and determining the current loading rates for the pollutants of interest. This is done by
modeling the loads that enter the stream, using precipitation and land use characteristic data. For this
analysis the AVGWLF model (the Environmental Resources Research Institute of the Pennsylvania State
University’s ArcView based version of the Generalized Watershed Loading Function model developed by
Cornell University) is used. This modeling process uses loading rates in the non-impaired watershed as a
target for loading reductions in the impaired watershed. The impaired watershed is modeled to determine the
current loading rates and determine what reductions are necessary to meet the loading rates of the non-
impaired watershed. GWLF models surface runoff using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number (SCS-
CN) approach with daily weather (temperature and precipitation inputs. All of the equations used by the
model can be viewed in Attachment E, GWLF Users Manual.
Two factors form the basis to select a suitable reference watershed. The first factor is a watershed that had
been assessed by the Department using the Unassessed Waters Protocol and is attaining water quality
standards. The second factor is a watershed that closely resembled the subject watershed in physical

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 27
properties such as land cover/landuse, physiographic province, size and geology. This is done by means of a
desktop screening using several GIS coverages.
The federal regulations at 40 CFR Section 130.7(a) require that the process for incorporating public
involvement into the development of a state’s 303(d) list and the development of TMDLs be included in a
state’s CPP document. Public participation of the 1998 Section 303(d) list included sending more than 300
letters to watershed groups, universities, county conservation districts and other potential sources to solicit
data on water quality. The data then was evaluated for inclusion on the draft Section 303(d) list that was
published on February 28, 1998 in the PA Bulletin for a 30-day comment period). A final list was submitted
to meet EPA’s April 1, 1998 deadline. A revised list was submitted on August 7, 1998 and approved by
EPA on August 27, 1998. The Department plans to use a similar public participation process in developing
future Section 303(d) lists to see TMDLs are noticed for public participation in the PA Bulletin, local
newspapers and the DEP UPDATE and posted on DEP’s website. Comments are incorporated into the final
report andnotice of final TMDLs are also published in the PA Bulletin. As TMDLs are developed and
approved for waters impaired by nonpoint source pollution, these waters will be identified in future
Section 319 Grant Project Proposal requests and given priority for funding future restoration actions. A list
of EPA approved TMDLs is in Section III.B.3 of this document. PADEP plans to use a similar public
participation process in establishing TMDLs based on future 303(d) lists.
References: Watershed Management and TMDLs (Fact Sheet 3900-FS-DEP2248, dated 6/98);
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 1998 Section 303(d) List (dated 8/7/98); Process for Low Flow TMDLs
D.
Element 4 - Process for updating and maintaining Water Quality Management (WQM) Plans,
including schedules for revision
PA’s Clean Streams Law provides the planning and implementation authority necessary to satisfy the water
quality management planning requirements of the federal Clean Water Act. In Section 4, one of the
declarations of policy states that “… the achievement of the objectives (of the law) requires a comprehensive
program of watershed management and control… ”. Also, Section 5 requires the Department to consider
water quality management and pollution control in the watershed as a whole, to consider the feasibility of
combined or joint treatment facilities, and to coordinate and be responsible for the development and
implementation of comprehensive public water supply, waste management and other water quality
management plans.
In addition to the planning authority granted under the Clean Streams Law, the Department is also
empowered under the Pennsylvania Sewage Facilities Act (Act of January 24, 1966, P. L. 1535, as amended)
to establish and maintain a program of local sewage facilities planning. Under the program, municipalities
must develop an official plan for providing adequate sewerage facilities, and from time to time, supplement
and/or revise this plan. Among other provisions, the law requires the municipal plan to “take into
consideration any existing State plan affecting the development, use and protection of water and other natural
resources.” These municipal sewage disposal plans are a major element of overall water quality management
planning in the Commonwealth. They are linked to the planning requirements of the Clean Streams Law in a
number of ways, including a regulatory provision (25 PA Code Chapter 71, Section 71.32) which states that,
in approving a municipal plan, PADEP must consider whether that plan furthers the policies established in
Sections 4 and 5 of the Clean Streams Law. Municipal sewage disposal plans, therefore, constitute an
element of areawide waste treatment and water quality management planning.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 28
There are a number of significant ongoing planning and assessment activities underway that constitute the
state’s water quality management planning and are considered updates to the Section 208 and 303(e)
planning efforts (described in the Element 2 narrative) that were undertaken in the 1970's and 1980’s. These
include Act 537 municipal sewerage planning, the issuance of NPDES permits and the development of
TMDLs, and a number of other activities, including those described below.
Under the provisions of the federal Clean Water Act, states are required to review and update state water
quality standards, as needed, at least every three years. The implementation of revised standards can affect
the development of TMDLs and the issuance/reissuance of NPDES permits and can impact on areawide
treatment plans where changes to standards can influence the economic or other considerations in an existing
plan for wastewater treatment and disposal.
Under the antidegradation provisions of state water quality regulations, certain watersheds, after assessment
are protected at their existing quality. In addition, state surface mining regulations allow for the designation
of certain areas as being unsuitable for mining because of geological and hydrological conditions which
would create adverse water quality impacts if mining were to take place. These two types of classifications
are considered revisions to water quality management plans.
Pennsylvania’s Quality Management Plan (QMP) provides the overall quality assurance program framework
and management system necessary to assure that data generated by or for the Department are of acceptable
quality to meet the needs of users and decision makers.
In Pennsylvania, there have been 14 lake assessment studies conducted and completed under the federal
Clean Lakes Program and PA’s nonpoint source pollution abatement program, and two others are in
progress. These studies have led to recommendations for lake water quality restoration that include
agricultural best management practices, protection of the stream corridors of waters feeding the lakes, lake
shoreline protection techniques, stormwater management techniques, point source controls, septic
management and other management practices and techniques. Nine of the study areas have initiated
implementation of study recommendations (Phase 2).
Pennsylvania has recently initiated a comprehensive program for assessing free-flowing waters and lakes to
determine their compliance with water quality standards. Full-scale field work for this project was initiated in
1997. As of the end of 1998, 24,408 miles of PA’s 83,240 miles of streams and rivers have been assessed.
After completion of this initial cycle of stream assessments, PADEP intends to implement a program of
reassessment on a five-year cycle. PADEP has identified 182 “significant” lakes in Pennsylvania, which have
been included in this comprehensive surface water assessment program. One hundred lakes were assessed
since 1995, and approximately 20 more lakes will be assessed each year for the next seven years. This
comprehensive assessment program is described in more detail in Pennsylvania’s 1998 Water Quality
Assessment 305(b) Report. PADEP is also participating with the USDA Natural Resource Conservation
Service in a Unified Watershed Assessment initiative that complements and is based on the assessment
activities described above.
Pennsylvania has stepped up its efforts to improve surface water quality through the reclamation of
abandoned mines. These efforts are described in the June 1998 Comprehensive Plan for Abandoned Mine
Reclamation prepared by PADEP’s Bureau of Abandoned Mine Reclamation. The plan calls for an update to
the statewide inventory of abandoned mine lands which describes environmental and safety problems with
these lands. It also prescribes the development of rehabilitation plans for correcting problems. Because
resources for the cleanup of abandoned mine lands are scarce compared to the extent of the problem, the

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 29
comprehensive plan includes a set of criteria for selecting the highest priority projects to receive attention and
grant funding.
Pollution from nonpoint sources is a major contributor to the number of miles of Commonwealth surface
waters that are not meeting water quality standards. Section 319 of the 1987 amendments to the federal
Clean Water Act requires states to prepare an Assessment Report and a Management Plan to guide the state
nonpoint source management program. PA’s Assessment Report and Management Plan were completed in
1990, and the state has received about $22.5 million from Section 319 funds plus funding from other sources
since then to strengthen the nonpoint source program, to implement innovative technologies to address
nonpoint source problems, to develop a nonpoint source education program and to begin several
comprehensive watershed initiatives. In 1999, Pennsylvania updated the Nonpoint Source Management
Program to incorporate EPA’s Nine Key Elements of an Effective NPS Program. Pennsylvania’s watershed
approach provides direction for the NPS program over the next four years and beyond.
The Chesapeake Bay Program includes a comprehensive approach to encourage better land management
practices within the agricultural community. The State Conservation Commission promotes these practices
through a comprehensive program to demonstrate new land management techniques, to foster new land
management attitudes, to furnish technical expertise and to provide financial assistance to landowners for the
installation of best management practices to control nonpoint sources of pollution.
Other plans and activities that contribute or will contribute to updating and maintaining PA’s water quality
management plans include plans developed under the provisions of the federal Coastal Zone Management
Act, Pennsylvania’s Source Water Assessment and Protection Program recently developed under the
provisions of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act, and nutrient management plans developed under the
provisions of the Nutrient Management Act.
In accordance with the Clean Water Action Plan, Pennsylvania coordinated efforts between state
environmental agencies, USDA and other agencies to create a Unified Watershed Assessment (UWA) by
October 1998 to identify watersheds needing restoration (Category I), watersheds needing preventive action
to sustain water quality (Category II), pristine or sensitive watersheds on federal or state lands (Category III)
and watersheds with insufficient data to make an assessment (Category IV).
Pennsylvania focused on identifying priority watersheds in all four categories prior to submitting a final
assessment and priority report. Pennsylvania’s priority setting process considered all available information
presented with emphasis on extent of impairment, agency support, and local interest and participation. A 30
day public comment period on the draft assessment received 23 responses. These comments were
incorporated as appropriate into the final draft submitted to meet the October 1, 1998 deadline. Twenty-nine
meetings were held during September, October and November of 1998 to provide information on the Unified
Watershed Assessment and receive public comments. This process provided an opportunity to consider
public comments and recommendations and additional priority setting methods and data for the future.
The Commonwealth selected priority watersheds at the state water plan scale for each watershed assessment
category with emphasis on specific state water plan watersheds within the eight digit watersheds identified as
Category I watersheds. Approximately 30 percent of the Category I watershed priorities are targeted for
some level of restoration activities during 1999-2000 with the remainder scheduled for attention in 2001 and
beyond.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 30
The development of Watershed Restoration Action Strategies (WRAS) for Category I Watersheds most in
need of restoration was also done as recommended by the Clean Water Action Plan. The Commonwealth
developed a process to prepare WRAS for high priority watersheds at Pennsylvania’s state water plan scale,
integrating programs underway in the watershed and coordinating efforts with other agencies, watershed
groups and the public. All incremental grant projects for FY 99 and 2000 are located in these watersheds and
are important components of each WRAS. Pennsylvania’s WRAS are summarized in outline form, with
sections detailing public outreach, monitoring and evaluation, specific water quality/natural resources goals,
implementation measures, schedules and funding needs.
Pennsylvania is developing total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and individual water quality based
limitations for pollutants in accordance with Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act and Section 130.7(a) of
this regulation. The point source waste load allocations are implemented through existing state regulations
under the NPDES permit program. For streams impaired by NPS, TMDLs are based on biological and
habitat end points or goals, rather than chemical water quality criteria. Quantifiable instream and streamside
habitat indicators are established and linked to allocated load reductions, and are used to demonstrate
resulting environmental improvement. Pollutant load reductions are estimated from recommended best
management practice installation or use.
Impaired streams requiring TMDL development are prioritized. Implementation of watershed restoration
plans are coordinated with TMDL development to ensure implementation funds, including Section 319 grant
money, are targeted to watersheds most in need of restoration, and where local support and interest and
existing water quality projects can enhance restoration efforts.
As TMDLs are developed and approved for waters impaired by nonpoint source pollution, these waters will
be identified in future Section 319 Grant Project Proposal requests and given priority for funding future
restoration actions.
Involving all the stakeholders in the watershed is the key to the successful implementation of TMDLs. Public
participation and outreach is an integral part of all TMDLs. DEP announces the public comment period in
the DEP UPDATE, the PA Bulletin and posts each proposed TMDL on the DEP website. A public meeting
is held to accommodate people within the watershed in order to outline the plan to achieve water quality
standards in the waterbody. A notice of final plan approval is published in the PA Bulletin and the TMDL
becomes part of the watershed management plan to restore and maintain water quality.
References: Clean Streams Law, PA Sewage Facilities Act, Nutrient Management Act, 25 PA Code Chapter
71, 25 PA Code Chapter 16, 25 PA Code Chapter 83, 25 PA Code Chapter 93, Strategy for Assessing PA’s
Unassessed Surface Waters, PA Water Quality Assessment 305(b) Report (April 1998), PA’s Comprehensive
Plan for Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Chesapeake Bay Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement Program
(Document Code 361-0100-002), PA Coastal Zone Management Program (Document Code 394-0300-001),
Process for Low Flow TMDLs and PA Quality Management Plan (Document Code 012-0800-001),
E.
Element 5 - Process for assuring adequate authority for intergovernmental cooperation in the
implementation of the State WQM program
Pennsylvania’s Constitution notes the importance of conserving and maintaining the environmental resources
of the Commonwealth. Article I (Declaration of Rights), Section 27 (Natural Resources and the Public
Estate) states, “The people have a right to clean air, pure water, and to the preservation of the natural, scenic,

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 31
historic and esthetic values of the environment. Pennsylvania’s public natural resources are the common
property of all the people, including generations yet to come. As trustee of these resources, the
Commonwealth shall conserve and maintain them for the benefit of all the people.”
The Administrative Code defines the powers and duties of the Governor and other executive and
administrative officers and the administrative departments, boards, commissions and officers, including the
Department of Environmental Resources (created by an amendment to the Code in 1970). In 1995, the
Conservation and Natural Resources Act split the Department into two separate agencies - the Departments
of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and Environmental Protection (PADEP) - and defined the
powers, duties, functions and rulemaking authority of each. As defined, PADEP is the lead state agency for
administering Pennsylvania’s environmental laws and regulations, including those related to water quality
management.
Environmental reviews are coordinated through the Department’s Project Review and Evaluation (PREP).
This program provides a centralized review of federal projects which are required by federal and state
statutes to be reviewed for their potential impacts on Pennsylvania’s environment. The PREP Program
outlines a detailed description of the project review process within the Department. The PREP Program is
administred by the Department’s Office of Policy which is responsible for resolving conflicts, coordination
and developing a unified Departmental position on all comments, approvals and project recommendations.
This process involves coordination with all six of the Department’s regional offices. Working in this manner,
specialized field staff can provide input into projects where their expertise and experience is invaluable.
One of the major benefits of PREP is that it establishes within the Department a single point of contact for
project reviews and provides a uniform process for reviewing and tracking projects. This allows the
Department to provide timely and useful comments for all projects. PREP assures that all appropriate
program areas within the Department have an opportunity to comment on federal projects and that project
applicants are made aware of the Department’s concerns and requirements. The process also ensures a
timely review of each project.
Primary authority for Pennsylvania’s water quality management program comes from the Clean Streams Law
(and related regulations in 25 PA Code Chapters 91 through 105) which was first enacted in 1937 and was
recognized nationally as ground-breaking state environmental legislation. The statute has been amended
many times since 1937 to address new federal requirements, new science, and new environmental protection
concepts and attitudes.
The Sewage Facilities Act and related regulation (25 PA Code Chapter 71) provides for the planning and
regulation of community sewage systems and individual sewage systems and authorizes PADER (now
PADEP) to administer the Act. Section 3 of the Act declares it to be the policy of the Commonwealth to (1)
protect the public health, safety and welfare of its citizens through the development and implementation of
plans for the sanitary disposal of sewage waste, and (2) promote intermunicipal cooperation in the
implementation and administration of such plans by local government.
The Conservation District Law created the State Conservation Commission to administer the law and
provided it with powers and duties relating to the conservation of soil, water and related natural resources
and land use practices contributing to soil wastage and soil erosion. The law also provided for the
organization of the various counties into conservation districts and specified their powers and duties. Section
11 of the law specifies how Commonwealth agencies may cooperate with the Districts in “… the effectuation
of programs and operations undertaken… ” by the Districts. The Nutrient Management Act imposes further

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 32
duties and responsibilities upon the State Conservation Commission, PADEP, PDA, the Conservation
Districts and others to work together to manage nutrients on certain agricultural operations to abate nonpoint
source pollution and to assess other nonpoint sources of nutrient pollution to the waters of the
Commonwealth. Provisions of the Nutrient Management regulations (25 PA Code Chapter 83) have been
issued under both the Conservation District Law and the Nutrient Management Act.
The Dam Safety and Encroachments Act and Clean Streams Law provide PADEP with the authority to
regulate dams and reservoirs, water obstructions and encroachments in order to protect the natural resources,
environmental rights and values secured by the PA Constitution, and to conserve the water quality, natural
regime and carrying capacity of watercourses. Section 17 of the Act addresses intergovernmental
coordination (Federal; Interstate; Local) and program function (permitting; inspection/monitoring;
enforcement) delegations to local agencies (County Conservation Districts; Other County Agencies). The
PA State Programmatic General Permit (PASPGP) authorization from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
signifies that the Commonwealth’s Chapter 105 permit process meets the federal Clean Water Act Section
404 permit requirements for various categories of activities and eliminates the need for redundant reviews by
the Corps, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and USEPA. This provides “one-stop” for approximately 90
percent of the state and federal permit applications received. Where there are habitats for federal species of
concern, an approval letter from USFWS must be received before a permit is issued and the activity is
reported under the PASPGP. The 401 water quality certification is evaluated during the environmental
review for Chapter 105 permit and issued concurrently with the Chapter 105 permit. An Environmental
Review Committee, consisting of representatives of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS),
Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC), Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC), EPA, U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers (COE) and DEP, meets monthly to review select applications submitted to DEP. A
similar committee has been established which meets semi-annually to review ongoing enforcement actions.
Through these committees, lead agencies are designated for taking action or providing field support to
resolve violations or to provide data for the permit reviews. This coordination economically utilizes limited
staff of both state and federal agencies.
The Local Health Administration Law authorizes (1) the establishment of local health departments (County;
municipal) and (2) state grants if certain prescribed requirements are met. Chapter 15 of the state Advisory
Health Board’s regulations sets forth the provisions under which local health departments may receive
Commonwealth grants under the law, including the minimum public health program services they must
provide (Administrative and Supportive; Personal Health; Environmental Health). Chapter 17 of the Health
Board’s regulations specifies the minimum program activities and standards of performance for
Environmental Health Services, including those relating to the Water Pollution Control Program. PADER
(now PADEP) participated in the development of these standards with the local health departments and
DOH.
The PA Fish and Boat Code specifies the organization of the PA Fish and Boat Commission and outlines its
powers and duties, including those related to the protection of water. Chapters 51 and 57 of the
Commission’s statements of policy outline the administrative procedures of the agency, including those
related to working with PADEP to advance and seek the highest water quality designation for waters of the
Commonwealth. The Commission also serves as a member of the Environmental Quality Board, the state’s
environmental rulemaking body.
The Governor’s Executive Order on Agricultural Land Preservation specifies the policy all state agencies are
to follow in implementing programs and regulations to protect agricultural land, and establishes an
interagency committee to address mutual problems. The Executive Order on Land Use Planning provides

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 33
guidance to all Commonwealth agencies when making decisions that impact land uses, establishes a Council
to monitor state government operations, and directs PADEP to establish a statewide geographic information
system for sharing common geospatial data with state agencies and local governments.
The federal National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting program is a major
element of the state water quality management program for improving and protecting the state’s surface
waters. Under Section 402 of the Federal Clean Water Act, USEPA has the responsibility to issue NPDES
permits for treated wastewater discharges but may delegate that responsibility to qualifying state
environmental protection agencies. In Pennsylvania, that responsibility has been delegated to the Department
of Environmental Protection. To qualify for program delegation, the state must demonstrate that it has the
legal authority, the program mechanisms and the staffing to carry out the delegated responsibilities.
Minimum requirements for delegation are described in federal regulations at 40 CFR Part 123.
NPDES program responsibilities were first delegated to Pennsylvania in 1978. At that time, an agreement
between the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the then Department of Environmental
Resources (now DEP) was executed. The Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was updated in June of
1991. The MOA describes specific PADEP and USEPA responsibilities for implementing the NPDES
program, including permit review and issuance procedures, enforcement procedures and responsibilities,
information reporting procedures and provisions for periodic USEPA review of PADEP’s implementation of
the NPDES program. All delegable NPDES functions are being implemented by PADEP except review and
approval of municipal pretreatment programs and permitting for biosolids disposal.
The MOA is a partnership between DEP and EPA to assure the successful and effective administration and
enforcement of NPDES. In this partnership, EPA will provide to DEP, on a continuing basis, technical,
expert, legal and other assistance on permit matters as requested. DEP has primary responsibility for
implementing the NPDES program for Pennsylvania. DEP has the primary responsibility to establish State
NPDES program priorities which are consistent with national goals and objectives.
The MOA represents a complete description of the scope of and procedures for responsibilities. The 1991
agreement was signed with the understanding that it does not represent specific annual commitments. These
commitments are negotiated between DEP and EPA annually based on priorities and available resources.
The DEP-EPA MOA for NPDES also integrates the requirements of the federal Surface Mining Control and
Reclamation Act. As a result, the environmental regulation of coal mining activities is conducted in a holistic
manner and is the most effective way to protect the environment.
The strategies and priorities for issuance, compliance monitoring and enforcement of permits, as established
in the NPDES MOA, will be set forth in more detail in the Annual State 106 Program Plan and the
State/EPA Enforcement Agreement. This MOA, the State 106 Program Plan, the State/EPA Enforcement
Agreement and any other State/EPA Agreements regarding the NPDES program shall be consistent. The
State/EPA Enforcement Agreement may not override the MOA, as required by 40 CFR §123.24(c).
The provision of financial assistance to public entities for the planning, design and construction of facilities
needed to protect surface waters from pollution has been a significant factor in water quality improvements
since the 1960’s. For many years, the backbone of the financial assistance programs was the Federal
Construction Grants Program. Amendments to the federal Clean Water Act (The Water Quality Act of
1987) phased out the grants program and provided the opportunity for states to establish revolving loan
programs to provide financial assistance using, in part, funds appropriated by the U.S. Congress,
supplemented by state and local funds. In Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 34
Authority (PIIA) and PADEP jointly administer the wastewater revolving loan program. PIIA has the
primary responsibility for administering available funds and awarding loans; PADEP carries out project
technical review and priority rating functions. In order to qualify for federal funds to capitalize the revolving
loan program, the state must comply with provisions of the federal Clean Water Act and federal regulations
promulgated to implement the program and must also execute an agreement on program implementation with
USEPA. Pennsylvania implements an approved revolving loan program funded in part with federal funds.
The most recent Operating Agreement between USEPA and Pennsylvania was executed on May 5, 1997. In
addition, an MOU dated April 23, 1997, between PADEP and the PIIA describes the authority,
responsibilities and procedures of each agency in administering the infrastructure funding programs
authorized under the state PIIA Act and the federal Safe Drinking Water and Clean Water Acts. PADEP’s
regulations (25 PA Code 103) specify the procedures it follows in assisting the PIIA in providing loans for
municipal sewerage projects. The PIIA’s guidelines on application procedures, including the roles of PADEP
and Commerce (now Community and Economic Development), are contained in 25 PA Code Chapter 961.
Its financial assistance criteria are contained in 25 PA Code Chapter 963.
The protection of Pennsylvania surface waters from the polluting effects of uncontrolled drainage from the
surface mining of coal and other minerals is an important element of Pennsylvania’s water quality
management program. In addition to state statutes which control such drainage, the federal Surface Mining
Control and Reclamation Act also imposes requirements on the mining industry to prevent water pollution.
The provisions of that federal statute are implemented by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) in the
Department of the Interior, but portions of those responsibilities are delegable to the states. The state
Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act and related regulations (25 PA Code Chapters 86 through
90) enabled PA to maintain primary jurisdiction over surface coal mining pursuant to the federal Act.
PADEP is currently implementing elements of this program under an agreement with OSM titled
“Conditional Approval of the Permanent Program Submission from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977” and a related program oversight
Memorandum of Agreement, both of which were effective on July 31, 1982. An additional MOU, dated
8/29/97, describes how PA and OSM will integrate information systems and share data in implementing the
federal Act.
The Noncoal Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act and related regulation (25 PA Code Chapter
77) authorize PADEP to regulate the surface mining of noncoal minerals. Section 25 of the Act authorizes
PADEP to delegate one or more of its regulatory functions under this act to County Conservation Districts
for certain licensed surface mining operators.
Many other interagency agreements, memorandums of understanding (MOUs) and technical guidance
documents further assure the means of implementing the water quality management program in a coordinated
and cooperative way. These are identified in Section III.B.1. (§ 130.5(b)(5)).
F.
Element 6 - Process for establishing and assuring adequate implementation of new or revised water
quality standards, including schedules of compliance, under Section 303(c) of the Act
Section 303(c) of the Clean Water Act requires that “the Governor of a State or the State water pollution
control agency of such State shall from time to time (but at least once each three year period beginning with
October 18, 1972) hold public hearings for the purpose of reviewing applicable water quality standards and,
as appropriate, modifying and adopting standards. Results of such review shall be made available to the
Administration.” Regulations to implement Section 303(c) are found at 40 CFR Part 131-Water Quality

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 35
Standards. This part describes the requirements and procedures for developing, reviewing, revising, and
approving water quality standards by the States. Additional specific procedures for developing, reviewing,
revising, and approving water quality standards for Great Lake States or Great Lake Tribes to conform to
Section 118 of the Clean Water Act and 40 CFR Part 132 are provided in 40 CFR Part 132. The Great
Lakes Initiative (GLI) requirements provide for consistent protection for fish and shellfish in the Great Lakes
System and the people and wildlife who consume them. The GLI focuses on long-lasting pollutants called
bioaccumulative chemicals of concern (BCCs) that accumulate in the food web of large lakes. The major
elements of the GLI are: water quality criteria to protect human health, aquatic life and wildlife;
methodologies for criteria development; procedures for developing effluent limits for point sources; and
antidegradation policies and procedures. States are required to adopt water quality standards,
antidegradation policies and implementation procedures “as protective as” the GLI. Pennsylvania amended
its GLI regulations at Chapter 93, and its statement of policy at Chapter 16, to meet these goals, on
December 27, 1997 (27 Pa.B. 6799/6817)
The Commonwealth’s strategy for complying with the GLI has two major objectives. The first objective is
wherever possible, to provide Statewide consistency, so that unequal requirements are not focused on
specific regions of this Commonwealth. The second objective is to provide special protection to the unique
resource known as the Great Lakes System in this Commonwealth. Once EPA approves the
Commonwealth’s strategy for complying with the Great Lakes Initiative and the Regulatory Basis Initiative
(RBI) amendments are final, the technical guidances will be amended. RBI contains some statewide changes
to give consistency across state (e.g., Cr+3 criterion statewide)
The Commonwealth’s triennial review and public participation process adheres, as a minimum, to the basic
elements described in the above regulations. The Commonwealth has historically supplemented these
minimum federal requirements through the use of increased advisory committee consultations, additional
public participation, and an expanded regulatory review and oversight process. The basic elements in the
triennial review and public participation process include: 1) identification of issues requiring review (both
new and existing); 2) discussion of options for each issue with the Department’s water quality advisory
committee; 3) drafting of proposed rulemaking including necessary background information and economic
impacts analysis; 4) presentation of proposed rulemaking to the Environmental Quality Board (EQB) for
approval with recommended public participation; 5) publication of proposed rulemaking in
Pennsylvania
Bulletin
for review and comment including announcement regarding time and location of a public
meeting/hearing along with newspaper notices throughout the Commonwealth and posting on DEP’s
website; 6) forwarding proposed rulemaking to the Independent Regulatory Review Commission (IRRC) and
House and Senate standing committees for review and comment; 7) preparation of final rulemaking including
detailed Comment/Response document considering all comments received from the public, IRRC and the
standing committees; 8) presentation of final rulemaking to the EQB for approval; 9) forwarding final
approved regulations to IRRC and the standing committees for approval or disapproval; 10) forwarding final
approved regulations to the Governor’s Office of General Counsel and the state Attorney General’s Office
for review; and 11) publishing the final regulation in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
.
In addition to the public participation requirements described above, the Commonwealth further supplements
the public participation requirement in 40 CFR Section 131.20 by holding a public meeting or meetings
and/or more than one public hearing, increasing the length of the public comment period, and where
appropriate, including an Advance Notice of Final Rulemaking (ANFR) with additional opportunities for
public review and comment between proposed and final rulemaking. The ANFR process generally allows for
additional public meetings/hearings to be held in areas of the Commonwealth as needed to reach a maximum

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 36
number of interested persons. Other public participation measures are also provided in the Department’s
antidegradation regulations in 25 Pa. Code Chapter 93.
Water quality standards serve as the keystone of Pennsylvania’s water quality management planning and
management program. Some type of water quality standard has been in use for more than 70 years in
Pennsylvania. One of the Sanitary Water Board’s (predecessor to the EQB) early actions after its creation in
1923 was to classify streams as to priority for water quality management actions. During the period 1966
through 1973, specific water quality standards were developed for all Pennsylvania surface waters. These
water quality standards had three major parts: 1) a listing of water uses to be protected; 2) general and
specific water quality criteria; and 3) a plan of implementation describing the effluent limitations necessary for
point source discharges to meet the water quality standards.
The petition process to have a water quality standard changed is prescribed in Chapter 23, Environmental
Quality Board Policy for Processing Petitions, Appendix A, Special Procedures for Petitions for Stream
Redesignations under the Clean Streams Law and Chapter 93. If the EQB accepts the petition, the
Department has 60 days to prepare a preliminary status report. The Department will include a review of the
technical merits, a determination of relative priority in relation to other requests for redesignations, and an
anticipated date for submission of a complete proposed rulemaking package to the EQB for their
consideration. This date, and revisions to this date, will be reflected in the EQB’s Regulatory Status Report.
Chapter 16, Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy, is a water quality policy for regulating toxic
pollutants. It sets forth the guidelines for development of criteria for toxic substances, and lists the water
quality criteria and the analytical methods and detection limits for toxic substances. Chapter 16 is directly
referenced as a support policy document in the Department’s toxic substances regulation at Section 93.8a(b).
Section 93.8a(i) provides that, at intervals not exceeding one year, the Department will publish new or
revised water quality criterion for toxic substances and revised procedure for criteria development in the Pa.
Bulletin.
TRIENNIAL REVIEW OF WATER QUALITY CRITERIA AND STANDARDS:
With the approval of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (P. L. 92-500) in 1972, the Commonwealth
published a report and proposed rulemaking in the March 4, 1978
Pennsylvania Bulletin
(8 PaB 511) which
constituted the Commonwealth’s proposal to meet the first triennial review under this statute. PA DER held
a series of eight (8) public hearings on these proposed revisions, in various locations throughout Pennsylvania
during April and May 1978. PA DER also solicited written testimony until 1978. PA DER presented its
proposed recommendations, which replaced the existing Chapter 93 with a new Chapter 93, and revised the
anti-degradation regulation contained in Chapter 95, to the Environmental Quality Board (EQB) on
December 5, 1978. The EQB accepted the recommendations for publication as proposed rulemaking. The
EQB notice of Proposed Rulemaking was published in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on December 23, 1978 (8
PaB 3665). The EQB held another public hearing on February 22, 1979 during the 60-day public comment
period on the proposed rulemaking. Final Rules and Regulations were approved by the EQB on August 21,
1979, and published in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on September 8, 1979, which were effective on October 8,
1979. This was PA DER’s first official Triennial Review of water quality criteria and standards, which was
submitted to U.S Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Region III on September 28, 1979. U.S.
EPA Region III formally approved the revisions to Pennsylvania’s water quality standards on January 26,
1981.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 37
TR-85 (Phase I):
Review of possible water quality issues and development of recommended amendments to the water quality
standards began almost immediately following U.S. EPA Region III’s approval of Pennsylvania’s previous
water quality criteria revisions in 1981.
Proposed revisions to Chapters 93, 95 and 101 that were approved by the EQB on April 24, 1984 and
published as proposed rulemaking in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on September 22, 1984 constituted Phase I of
what later became identified as Pennsylvania’s TR-85 triennial review. The Phase I triennial review primarily
addressed statewide and site-specific issues affecting construction grant decisions.
The statewide issues included the statewide water use; water quality criteria for ammonia and total residual
chlorine; phosphorus discharges to streams, lakes, ponds and impoundments; time extensions to achieve
water quality-based effluent limitations; and treatment requirements for discharges to waters affected by
abandoned mine drainage.
A second category of this triennial review contained recommendations based on site-specific waterbody
surveys and evaluations to determine whether the designated uses of the streams are appropriate and/or
attainable.
The EQB held a public hearing on the proposed revisions on November 8, 1984. The final revisions were
approved by the EQB on December 18, 1984. They became effective upon publication as final rules and
regulations in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on February 16, 1985 (7 PaB 544).
U.S. EPA Region III approved these revisions to the water quality criteria on May 14, 1985. However, EPA
Region III also negotiated an agreement with PA DER to conduct further evaluations concerning the need
for a total residual chlorine standard.
TR-89 (Phase II):
PA DER conducted a public review / participation process during Phase II of the Triennial Review of water
quality standards that started in January 1985. Proposed revisions to Chapters 93 and 97 were presented to
the EQB on January 19, 1988 and published in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
as proposed rulemaking on April
23, 1988 (18 PaB 1997). A notice of availability of the Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy, Chapter
16 Statement of Policy proposal, which is also incorporated by reference in Chapter 93, was published in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on April 23, 1988 (18 PaB 1961). This proposed rulemaking and announcement of
availability for Chapter 16 constituted Phase II of Pennsylvania’s triennial review of water quality standards.
Phase II of Pennsylvania’s triennial review, like Phase I, was divided into two (2) categories of statewide
and/or site-specific concerns. First were a number of general regulatory requirements and standards that
would affect permits for pollution control facilities on a statewide basis when implemented; and secondly
there were several site-specific waterbody surveys and evaluations to determine whether the water contact
sport use of the streams are appropriate and/or attainable.
The statewide issues included toxics management, temperature criteria, design conditions, reformulation of
the Chapter 93 water quality criteria (nomenclature), and additions and deletions to the list of definitions in
Chapter 93. The site-specific issues included an evaluation of the non-fishable/non-swimmable designated
use for several waterbodies and adding Kettle Creek to drainage list L since it was inadvertently omitted.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 38
The EQB held three public hearings at three locations in Pennsylvania during June 1988 on the proposed
revisions to Chapters 93 and 97. Separate public hearings were also held at the same locations on the
Chapter 16 proposal.
The EQB approved the Chapter 93 and 97 revisions to the water quality standards on November 15, 1988,
which were published as final rulemaking in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on March 11, 1989 (19 PaB 968).
The Department also published a notice in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on March 11, 1989 (19 PaB 1059),
adding the new Chapter 16 Statement of Policy to Title 25 of the Pennsylvania Code. As required by
provisions in Chapter 93, PA DER will, at least annually, publish revisions and additions to Chapter 16 in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
.
PA DER submitted these revised water quality standards and Statement of Policy to U.S. EPA Region III on
April 17, 1989. EPA Region III conditionally approved the revisions on September 29, 1989 since, in part,
the criteria for toxics, and the procedures for developing these criteria are contained in a policy. They
wanted PA DER to add certain assurances that shows the policy, which lists the toxic water quality criteria
established under Chapter 93, meets the requirements of the Clean Water Act for adoption, and EPA’s
requirements for public participation. These concerns were eventually resolved to U.S. EPA Region III’s
satisfaction and approval of the subsequent revisions to Chapter 93 and Chapter 16, Subchapter A was
granted on April 11, 1990, and for Subchapter B on May 29, 1990.
EPA commented that there were several issues which were not considered as part of the Phase II triennial
review which should be addressed during the next triennial review. These included PA DER’s evaluation of
new or updated criteria for aluminum, ammonia, bacteria, chlorides, and chlorine; and implementation
procedures for the antidegradation policy needed to be finalized and submitted to EPA for approval.
Additionally, U.S. EPA Region III pointed out that PA DER’s total residual chlorine policy continued to be
an outstanding issue with U.S. EPA, which was to continue to be included as part of Pennsylvania’s FY1990
work plan for the Section 205(j)(1) grant.
TR-92:
The Triennial Water Quality Standards package was published as proposed rulemaking in the
Pennsylvania
Bulletin
on May 23, 1992 (22 PaB 2732).
A public hearing for the proposed revisions was held in Harrisburg on July 1, 1992.
A notice of public hearing and advanced notice of final rulemaking (ANFR) was published in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on March 13, 1993 (23 PaB 1155), announcing several draft final rulemaking changes
to the proposal published on May 23, 1992.
The triennial Review of Water Quality Standards was adopted by the EQB at its meetings of August 17,
1993 and November 15, 1993. These revisions to Chapter 93 were published as final rules and regulations in
the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on February 12, 1994 (24 PaB 832).
PA DER submitted revisions to the water quality standards to U.S. EPA Region III on March 9, 1994.
U.S. EPA Region III disapproved certain provisions of Pennsylvania’s water quality standards and portions
of the triennial review of water quality standards on June 6, 1994. These included existing use protection,

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 39
portions of the Special Protection Waters Program, ambient concentration, aluminum, endangered species
protection and the implementation of PA DER’s acute criterion for ammonia. In response to EPA’s July
1992 comments, the Department incorporated portions of the wetlands protection program in Chapter 105
into the Department’s water quality standards program.
U.S. EPA Region III explained that PA DER must move to adopt the changes described in the June 6, 1994
disapproval letter or EPA must promptly propose and promulgate such standards for the Commonwealth.
PA DER responded to EPA Region III in a letter dated September 2, 1994, and EPA Region III responded in
a letter dated October 5, 1994. EPA said that there were several areas where the agencies have reached
agreement, but all of the outstanding disapprovals must be removed.
Regulatory Negotiations (RegNeg) & Anti-degradation Rulemaking:
In response to U.S. EPA Region III’s disapproval of portions of the Special Protection Waters Program, PA
DER convened a group of interested stakeholders representing conservationists, the regulated community
and government in a regulatory negotiations (RegNeg) process. Meetings began in June 1995 and continued
monthly until August 1, 1996. The group signed a Phase I Interim Report on April 1, 1996 that described
some issues on which conditional consensus had been reached. The Phase I report also described other
issues yet to be resolved, but the RegNeg group concluded on August 1, 1996 that the group was at an
impasse on several outstanding issues and agreed to submit separate reports to the PA DER. Separate
reports from the Conservation stakeholders and the Regulated community stakeholders were submitted to PA
DER during the week of August 19, 1996.
PA DEP prepared draft proposed revisions to Pennsylvania’s Special Protection Waters Program based in
part on the RegNeg Interim Report. The draft regulation was made available for public comment on May 4,
1996 (26 Pa B 2131), which concluded with a public hearing on June 18, 1996 in Harrisburg.
Concurrently, however, U.S. EPA Region III was ordered by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District
of Pennsylvania on April 16, 1996 to promptly promulgate proposed federal regulations for Pennsylvania’s
antidegradation program. Proposed federal regulations were published in the Federal Register on August 29,
1996 (61 Fed Reg 45379), and EPA Region III held a public hearing on the proposed regulation on October
16, 1996. Final federal regulations were published in the Federal Register on December 9, 1996 (61 Fed Reg
64816).
PA DER considered the public input it received on the draft proposed rulemaking, as well as the input from
the RegNeg group to prepare a proposed antidegradation rulemaking that was presented to the EQB on
January 21, 1997. This proposal recommended revisions to Chapters 92, 93 and 95, with the creation of a
new Chapter 15 containing implementation procedures for the Special Protection Waters Program. The EQB
adopted the proposal, which was published in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on March 22, 1997 (27 PaB 1459) a
60-day public comment period. EQB held a public hearing on May 7, 1997 in Harrisburg.
Based on adverse comments on the proposal, PA DEP developed extensively revised draft final regulations.
The proposal for a new Chapter 15 was not included in the ANFR. Notice of availability of this ANFR was
published in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on January 23, 1999 (29 PaB 455) with provisions for a public
comment period until February 22, 1999. Also included were three public meetings/hearings that were held
in the Harrisburg, Conshohocken, and Pittsburgh Regional Offices during February 1999.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 40
PA DEP prepared final regulatory revisions to Chapters 92, 93 and 95 based on input from the proposed
rulemaking, PA DEP’s ANFR, the Water Resources Advisory Committee (WRAC), and numerous other
stakeholders, committees, groups, advisory committees, and other interested parties to present to the EQB
on May 19, 1999. The EQB accepted the final revisions. The final regulations were published in the
Pennsylvania Bulletin
on July 17, 1999 (29 PaB 3720).
PA DEP submitted the revised water quality standards to U.S. EPA Region III for formal review and
approval on August 13, 1999.
Regulatory Basics Initiative (RBI):
PA DEP also developed proposed revisions to Chapters 92, 93, 95, and 97, and the addition of a newly
proposed Chapter 96, relating to the Commonwealth’s water quality protection and management as part of
the 1998 Water Quality Regulatory Basics Initiative (RBI). The RBI proposed rulemaking was adopted by
the EQB on June 16, 1998.
The RBI proposed rulemaking was published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin on August 29, 1998 (28 PaB
4431), with provisions for a 60-day public comment period which concluded on October 28, 1998. In
addition, three public hearings were held at the Southwest (Pittsburgh), Southcentral (Harrisburg), and
Southeast (Conshohocken) Regional Offices during October 1998.
Concurrently, PA DEP proposed amendments to the Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy contained
in Chapter 16. A notice of availability for public comments and three public meetings/hearings was published
in the Pennsylvania Bulletin on August 29, 1998 (28 PaB 4289). This public comment period and the
meetings/hearings were held immediately following the EQB hearings.
In response to extensive public comments on the proposal, the Department published an ANFR in the Pa
Bulletin for Chapters 16, 92, 93, 95, 96, 97 on 9/18/99 (29 PaB 4872) with a 60 day comment period. Three
public meetings/hearings were held in the Pittsburgh, Harrisburg and Conshohocken DEP Regional Offices.
This proposed rulemaking, and proposed revisions to Chapter 16 Statement of Policy constitute the basis for
the Commonwealth’s current triennial review and supplement other changes made to the Department’s water
quality standards regulations which constitute ongoing revisions to Pennsylvania’s federally approved water
quality standards.
Petitions for redesignation of streams under Chapter 93 (relating to water quality standards) and The Clean
Streams Law (35 P.S. §§691.1-691.1001) are subject to the policy in Chapter 23. Environmental Quality
Board Policy for Processing Petitions - Appendix A Special Procedures for Petitions for Stream
Redesignations Under The Clean Streams Law and Chapter 93 - Statement of Policy. The general provisions
of Chapters 23 are to be followed, with specific provisions for the following supporting documentation:
1. Identification of available water quality information regarding instream water chemistry. The petition
should either provide actual data, or identify known sources of water chemistry data. The petition should
describe the extent and influence of point or nonpoint source discharges. An explanation of the efforts
made to obtain available instream water chemistry information must be included.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 41
2. Identification of the extent to which environmental values exist in the designated watershed including:
patterns of land ownership, degree of development in the watershed and the identification of sensitive
uses. The Department will complete the review for acceptability under §§23.1 and 23.2 within 45 days.
If, during its initial review under §23.2, the Department determines, based upon the contents of the petition
and other information readily available to the Department, that the requested action would be inconsistent
with the Department’s regulations in Chapter 93, the Department may recommend that the EQB not accept
the petition. The notification shall include the reasons for the Department’s recommendation.
If the EQB accepts the petition, the Department has 60 days to prepare a preliminary status report. The
Department will include a review of the technical merits, a determination of relative priority in relation to
other requests for redesignations, and an anticipated date for submission of a complete proposed rulemaking
package to the EQB for their consideration.. This date, and revisions to this date, will be reflected in the
EQB’s Regulatory Status Report.
Water quality standards formally define the Commonwealth’s water quality objectives and form the basis for
Pennsylvania’s water quality management and planning programs. Each water quality standards review is
part of the State’s continuing planning process. Pennsylvania’s water quality standards are included in 25 PA
Code Chapters 93, 16, and Chapter 105— Sections 105.1, 105.15, 105.17, 105.18a, 105.20a, and 105.451.
References: Federal Clean Water Act (CWA), 33 U.S.C. §1313(c); Federal Water Quality Standards
Regulations, 40 CFR Part 131; Pennsylvania Water Quality Standards Regulations/Statement of Policy, 25
PA Code Chapters 93, 16, and Chapter 105— Sections 105.1, 105.15, 105.17, 105.18a, 105.20a, and
105.451.
G.
Element 7 - Process for assuring adequate controls over the disposition of all residual waste from any
water treatment processing
State public water supply, water pollution control, and solid waste management regulatory provisions require
the proper treatment, storage and disposal of public drinking water and industrial process water treatment
plant wastes, including backwash waters, brines and sludges. Water treatment plant wastewaters are
“industrial wastes” which are regulated under the PA Clean Streams Law and the federal Clean Water Act.
Water treatment plant sludges are “residual wastes” which are regulated by the provisions of the PA Solid
Waste Management Act and the Clean Streams Law.
All water treatment plant wastewaters that are ultimately discharged to surface waters must be treated.
Direct discharges to surface waters are only authorized by NPDES permits issued by PADEP and may only
be approved if the discharge will not violate water quality standards and will meet any applicable technology
based effluent limitations. Facilities for the treatment of water treatment wastewaters must be approved by a
Water Quality Management (Part II) Permit issued by PADEP. Filter backwash water, unthickened sludge
and other wastewaters may also be discharged into an approved sanitary sewer system, but only after due
consideration is given to the hydraulic and organic load that will be imposed on the system. This disposal
method does not require an NPDES permit, but approval from the owner of the sanitary sewer system must
be obtained.
Impoundments used for the storage and/or treatment of water treatment wastewaters are subject to the
requirements of 25 PA Code Chapters 101, 287 and 289, and must be approved by PADEP. PADEP may

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 42
also approve the disposal of water treatment plant sludges on farmland or other suitable land disposal sites.
This disposal method requires the issuance of a permit under the provisions of the Solid Waste Management
Act, as set forth in 25 PA Code Chapter 291. Disposal at an approved landfill is often the recommended
disposal method for water treatment plant sludges. This disposal method requires PADEP approval and a
letter of acceptance from the landfill operator.
References: Public Water Supply Manual, Part II (Document Code 383-2125-108), Technology-Based
Control Requirements for Water Treatment Plant Wastes (Document Code 362-2183-003), 25 PA Code
Chapter 289 and 25 PA Code Chapter 291.
H.
Element 8 - Process for developing an inventory and ranking, in order of priority of needs for
construction of waste treatment works required to meet the applicable requirements of Sections 301
and 302 of the Act
Pennsylvania has had a process for inventorying and ranking public wastewater treatment works construction
needs in use since the late 1950’s. This is when federal water pollution control legislation first authorized the
awarding of federal construction grants to assist public entities with the cost of meeting federal and state
water pollution control requirements. In 1987, the U.S. Congress enacted federal Clean Water Act
amendments that phased out construction grants and authorized the establishment of state revolving loan
programs. In 1988, the Pennsylvania General Assembly enacted the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment
Authority Act in part to take advantage of the new federal funding program. As a result, the state inventory
and ranking process was modified to be consistent with the requirements of those statutes.
The Department of Environmental Protection maintains an inventory of identified public wastewater
treatment works construction needs called a Project Priority List. These inventoried projects are ranked in
accordance with a priority rating system established in regulations at 25 PA Code Chapter 103. As new
projects are developed, they are rated and added to the Project Priority List, providing an ongoing list of
potential projects for use of available loan funds. When federal and state funds become available (usually
annually) to fund treatment works construction, an Intended Use Plan is prepared jointly by the Department
and the PA Infrastructure Investment Authority (PIIA) staff. Projects are selected for inclusion on this
Intended Use Plan based their readiness to proceed and their relative priority among other such projects.
That rating is based on the priority rating system in Chapter 103 regulations and an Economic Development
rating which is prepared for each pending project by the PA Dept. of Community and Economic
Development. Public participation in the development of each Intended Use Plan and for each update to the
Project Priority List is provided through public hearings held jointly by the PIIA and PADEP. PADEP and
PIIA staff review information provided at the public hearings. When new information relating to the priority
rating factors is presented, project ratings are reviewed and, where appropriate, revised.
References: Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority Act, 25 PA Code Chapters 103, 961, 963 and
965, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania/USEPA Operating Agreement for Clean Water State Revolving Fund
and Drinking Water Revolving Fund, Memorandum of Understanding between the Dept. of Environmental
Protection and the PA Infrastructure Investment Authority (Document Code 381-5511-012), and Handbook
for PENNVEST Wastewater Projects (Document Code 381-5511-113).

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 43
I.
Element 9 - Process for determining the priority of permit issuance
a. Money-Back Guarantee Permit Review Program
On August 23, 1995, Governor Ridge issued Executive Order 1995-5 (effective July 1, 1995) establishing
the Money-Back Guarantee Permit Review Program for the Department of Environmental Protection.
The Order recognizes that (1) PADEP’s permitting function places significant responsibilities and
obligations on the regulated community; (2) delays in making permitting decisions often have significant
impacts on the individual, government and business planning process and do not enhance the ability of
PADEP to protect the Commonwealth’s natural resources; (3) both the Commonwealth and its diverse
population have a vital interest in timely answers within reasonable time frames, but not at the expense of
public comment and good environmental decisions; and (4) permit applicants have the responsibility to
submit applications that are complete and meet all requirements and include information necessary for the
agency to make a decision.
The Executive Order identifies an initial list of permit categories to be covered by the Program and
provides that PADEP will, on a yearly basis, consider adding new types of authorizations and, if
appropriate, adjust deadlines as processing times improve. Major and minor NPDES permits are included
in the DEP’s Money-Back Guarantee Program. Notice of these actions is published in the
Pennsylvania
Bulletin.
The overall deadlines include four phases – administrative completeness, technical review 1, technical
review 2 (if needed), and final decision. Opportunities for written public comment are factored into these
phases and usually run concurrently with the technical or decision reviews. The maximum number of
days for processing an application is the total of all four phases, plus the time the applicant may take to
submit additional information. The review clock starts ticking the day PADEP receives the application.
It stops ticking if an application is returned because it is deficient or incomplete. It may also stop if
PADEP determines that a public meeting or hearing is needed.
Failure by PADEP to meet the deadline does not affect the Department’s decision on the permit
application, nor will the Department approve an application automatically if it fails to meet the deadline.
If the deadline is not met, PADEP will automatically refund the application fee, and the applicant may
request the Department to (1) continue reviewing the application and agree on a deadline for a decision,
or (2) make a decision within 30 days based on the current record.
The Executive Order also provides that PADEP will coordinate the review of applications for projects
with multiple permits. The issuance or denial of a coordinated permit generally does not occur until such
time as the Department is prepared to make a decision on all coordinated applications for the involved
project.
b. Application Backlog
There is no backlog under the Money-Back Guarantee Program. PADEP had a backlog of applications
that were submitted prior to the inception of the Money-Back Guarantee Program. These were actively
worked on, and this backlog was also eliminated.
Based on PADEP’s records, there are no current application backlogs.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 44
c. Regional Program Plan
25 Pa. Code Chapter 92, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, specifies the rules and
procedures for obtaining an NPDES point source discharge permit under PA’s federally-delegated
program under Section 402 of the federal Clean Water Act, including the application for permits,
approval of applications, permittee monitoring, permit conditions, and miscellaneous related provisions.
The NPDES permits due to expire within a DEP Region are given priority in developing the Regional
Program Plan and are processed accordingly.
References: Governor’s Executive Order 1995-5 (8/23/95) - Money-Back Guarantee Permit Review
Program for the Department of Environmental Protection; Policy for Implementing the DEP Money-
Back Guarantee Permit Review Program (Document code 013-2000-001); DEP Money-Back Guarantee
Permit Review Program (Fact Sheet 0130-FS-DEP1835, revised 4/97).

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 45
Section III - Index of State Documents
A. State Documents Related to Introduction
Page
1. PADEP Organizational Chart ................................................................................................ 46
2. PADEP Regional Office Locations/Areas Served................................................................... 47
3. PADEP District Mining Office Locations/Areas Served ......................................................... 48

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR
WATER MANAGEMENT
Citizens Advisory Council
SECRETARY
Office of the Budget
Comptroller
Governor’s Policy Office
Executive Deputy Secretary for
Policy and Communications
Policy Office
Office of Communications
Program Integration and Effectiveness Office
Legislative Office
DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR
MANAGEMENT AND
TECHNICAL SERVICES
DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR
AIR, RECYCLING AND
RADIATION PROTECTION
DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR
MINERAL RESOURCES
MANAGEMENT
Classification, Placement and Recruitment
Employee Relations and Safety
Training and ADR Services
Personnel Systems and Employee Benefits
Bureau of Personnel
Bureau of Fiscal Management
Bureau of Information Services
Systems Development
Operations
Technology Support
Bureau of Office Systems and Services
Document Process and Reprographics
Office Planning Services
Contracts and Procurement
Certification, Licensing and Bonding
Facilities Management
Inorganic Services
Organic Radiation and Biological Services
Technical Support Services
Bureau of Laboratories
Bureau of Land Recycling
and Waste Management
Hazardous Waste Management
Waste Minimization and Planning
Land Recycling and Cleanup Program
Municipal and Residual Waste
Remediation Services
Reporting and Fee Collection
Bureau of Radiation Protection
Radiation Control
Nuclear Safety
Radons
Bureau of Air Quality
Air Resources Management
Air Quality Monitoring
Compliance and Enforcement
Source Testing and Monitoring
Permits
Bureau of Waterways Engineering
Project Inspection
Project Design
Project Evaluation
Dam Safety
Bureau of Water Quality Protection
Conservation Districts and Nutrient Management
Wastewater Management
Waterways, Wetlands and Erosion Control
Bureau of Water Supply Management
Municipal Financial Assistance
Technical Assistance and Outreach
Drinking Water Management
Bureau of Watershed Conservation
Water Quality Assessment Standards
Water Use Planning
Storage Tanks
Watershed Support
District Mining Operations
Pottsville
Hawk Run
Greensburg
Ebensburg
McMurray
Knox
Bureau of Abandoned Mine Reclamation
Acid Mine Drainage Abatement
Mine Hazards
Field Offices:
Ebensburg
Wilkes-Barre
Bureau of Oil and Gas Management
Subsurface Activities
Surface Activities
Enforcement and Administration
Bureau of Mining and Reclamation
Environmental Analysis and Support
Monitoring and Compliance
Permits
1.
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Bureau of Deep Mine Safety
Anthracite and Industrial Minerals Mine Safety
Program Development and Technical Services
Bituminous Mine Safety
Engineering Services

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 47
2. Department of Environmental Protection
Regional Offices
Office
County Responsibility
Northwest Office
230 Chestnut Street
Meadville, PA 16335-3481
(814) 332-6945
Butler, Clarion, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Jefferson,
Lawrence, McKean, Mercer, Venango, and Warren
Southwest Office
400 Waterfront Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15222-4745
(412) 442-4182, 442-4183
Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Cambria, Fayette,
Greene, Indiana, Somerset, Washington, and
Westmoreland
Northcentral Office
208 West Third Street, Suite 101
Williamsport, PA 17701-6448
(570) 327-3659
Bradford, Cameron, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton,
Columbia, Lycoming, Montour, Northumberland,
Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, and Union
Southcentral Office
909 Elmerton Avenue
Harrisburg, PA 17110-8200
(717) 705-4703
Adams, Bedford, Berks, Blair, Cumberland, Dauphin,
Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Juniata, Lancaster,
Lebanon, Mifflin, Perry, and York
Northeast Office
2 Public Square
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0790
(570) 826-2511
Carbon, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe,
Northampton, Pike, Schuylkill, Susquehanna, Wayne,
and Wyoming
Southeast Office
Lee Park, Suite 6010
555 North Lane
Conshohocken, PA 19428-2233
(610) 832-6020, 832-6011
Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and
Philadelphia

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 48
3.
DISTRICT MINING OFFICES
Six district mining offices oversee Pennsylvania’s mining program. Their duties include licensing, bonding, permitting and
inspecting all surface and underground anthracite and bituminous coal mines, coal preparation plants, coal refuse disposal
and industrial mineral quarries. The staff in the offices also concentrate on industry compliance assistance as well as all
aspects of pollution prevention advocacy.
District Mining Offices
Duties
Counties
McMurray District Mining Office
3913 Washington Road
McMurray, PA 15317-2532
(724) 941-7100
FAX (724) 941-7258
William Plassio, District Mining Manager
Permitting of all underground coal mines,
coal preparation plants, coal refuse
disposal areas. Mine subsidence
monitoring and compliance for the
bituminous region in the western half of
the Commonwealth. Implementation of
the Mine Subsidence Insurance program
for the entire Commonwealth.
Hawk Run District Mining Office
Empire Road
P.O. Box 209
Hawk Run, PA 16840-0209
(814) 342-8200
FAX (814) 342-8216
Michael Smith, District Mining Manager
Permitting of all bituminous surface
mines and industrial mineral quarries in
the listed counties. All surface
monitoring and compliance activities for
surface mines, deep mines, industrial
mineral sites, coal preparation plants and
coal refuse disposal areas in the listed
counties.
Bradford, Cameron, Centre,
Clearfield, Clinton,
Lycoming, Potter, Sullivan
and Tioga
Ebensburg District Mining Office
437 South Center Street
P.O. Box 625
Ebensburg, PA 15931
(814) 472-1900
FAX (814) 472-1898
Scott Horrell, District Mining Manager
Permitting of all bituminous surface
mines and industrial mineral quarries in
the listed counties.
Bedford, Blair, Cambria,
Fulton, Huntingdon, Indiana
and Somerset
Pottsville District Mining Office
5 West Laurel Boulevard
Pottsville, PA 17901-2454
(570) 621-3118
FAX (570) 621-3110
Roger Hornberger, District Mining Manager
Permitting and monitoring and
compliance activities for all anthracite
surface and deep mining, coal preparation
plants, coal refuse disposal and all
industrial mineral quarries in the listed
counties.
Adams, Berks, Bucks,
Carbon, Chester, Columbia,
Cumberland, Dauphin,
Delaware, Franklin, Juniata,
Lancaster, Lackawanna,
Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne,
Mifflin, Monroe,
Montgomery, Montour,
Northampton,
Northumberland, Perry,
Philadelphia, Pike,
Schuylkill, Snyder,
Susquehanna, Union,
Wayne, Wyoming and York

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 49
DISTRICT MINING OFFICES
(Continued)
District Mining Offices
Duties
Counties
Greensburg District Mining Office
Armbrust Building
R.D. #2, Box 603-C
Greensburg, PA 15601-0982
(724) 925-5500
FAX (724) 925-5557
James Brahosky, District Mining Manager
Permitting of all bituminous surface
mines and industrial mineral quarries in
the listed counties. All surface
monitoring and compliance activities for
surface mines, deep mines, industrial
mineral sites, coal preparation plants and
coal refuse disposal areas in the listed
counties.
Allegheny, Armstrong,
Beaver, Fayette, Greene,
Washington and
Wetmoreland
Knox District Mining Office
White Memorial Building
P.O. Box 669
Knox, PA 16232-0669
(814) 797-1191
FAX (814) 797-2706
Javed Mirza, District Mining Manager
Permitting of all bituminous surface
mines and industrial mineral quarries in
the listed counties. All surface
monitoring and compliance activities for
surface mines, deep mines, industrial
mineral sites, coal preparation plants and
coal refuse disposal areas in the listed
counties.
Butler, Clarion, Crawford,
Elk, Erie, Forest, Jefferson,
Lawrence, McKean,
Mercer, Venango and
Warren

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 50
B. State Documents Indexed to CPP Process
Page
1. Index of State CPP-Related Documents ...................................................................................... 51
a. Documents related to §130.5(b)(1) process for developing effluent limitations
and schedules of compliance ............................................................................................ 51
b. Documents related to §130.5(b)(2) process for incorporating elements of
applicable areawide waste treatment plans under Section 208 and basin management
plans under Section 209 of the Clean Water Act. ............................................................. 59
c. Documents related to §130.5(b)(3) process for developing total maximum
daily loads and individual water quality based effluent limits............................................. 63
d. Documents related to §130.5(b)(4) process for updating and maintaining
water quality management plans....................................................................................... 68
e. Documents related to §130.5(b)(5) process for assuring adequate authority
for intergovernmental cooperation in the implementation of the State Water
Quality Management Program.......................................................................................... 70
f. Documents related to §130.5(b)(6) process for establishing and assuring adequate
implementation of new or revised water quality standards including schedules
of compliance .................................................................................................................. 74
g. Documents related to §130.5(b)(7) process for assuring adequate controls over
the disposition of residual waste from water treatment processing .................................... 78
h. Documents related to §130.5(b)(8) process for developing an inventory and
ranking the need for construction of waste treatment works ............................................. 80
i. Documents related to §130.5(b)(9) process for determining the priority
of permit issuance ............................................................................................................ 81
2. Cross-Reference Table ................................................................................................................ 83
3. List of Approved TMDLs ........................................................................................................... 91

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 51
1. Index of State CPP-Related Documents
Documents in this Section are listed within each of EPA’s nine CPP Elements in the following hierarchy: (1)
Statutes (Laws; Acts; Codes); (2) Regulations (__ Pa. Code Chapter __); (3) Technical Guidance Documents
(Document code ___-____-___) in ascending order; and (4) Other documents (Executive Orders; MOA’s;
MOU’s; Strategies; etc.). For more detailed information about these documents, visit DEP’s electronic
website at www.dep.state.pa.us.
a.
§ 130.5(b)(1) Process for developing effluent limitations and schedules of compliance
On June 30, 1978, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) delegated the National
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program to the PA Department of Environmental
Resources (now PA Department of Environmental Protection or PADEP). A memorandum of
understanding (MOU) described the responsibilities of both agencies to manage this program. USEPA
and PADEP issued a revised MOU in June 1991. The processes described in the following documents
are used by PADEP to develop effluent limits and schedules of compliance.
Statutes
Title: Clean Streams Law, 35 P.S. § 691.1
et seq
.
Description: The objective of this law is to not only prevent further pollution of the waters of the
Commonwealth, but also to reclaim and restore to a clean, unpolluted condition every stream in
Pennsylvania that is presently polluted through a comprehensive program of watershed management and
control. The law authorizes PADEP to carry out certain powers and duties relating to planning,
permitting and enforcement in regulating discharges of sewage and industrial wastes and the operation of
mines and provides additional remedies for abating water pollution.
Title: Sewage Facilities Act, 35 P.S. § 750.1
et seq
.
Description: This law provides for the planning and regulation of community and individual sewage
systems to prevent and eliminate pollution of waters of the Commonwealth by coordinating planning for
the sanitary disposal of sewage wastes with a comprehensive program of water quality management.
Title: Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act, 52 P.S. § 1396.1
et seq
.
Description: This law provides for the conservation and improvement of areas of land affected in the
surface mining of bituminous and anthracite coal and metallic and nonmetallic minerals in order to
decrease soil erosion, prevent water pollution, protect water supplies, prevent combustion of unmined
coal, designate lands unsuitable for mining, and to maintain primary jurisdiction over surface coal mining
in PA.
Title: Coal Refuse Disposal Act, 52 P.S. § 30.51
et seq
.
Description: This law provides for the control and regulation of coal refuse disposal and encourages the
siting of coal refuse disposal operations on land previously disturbed by mining activities or coal refuse
disposal operations in order to prevent and eliminate certain conditions resulting from these operations
that are directly related to the safety, health, and welfare of the people of the Commonwealth.
Title: Noncoal Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act, 52 P.S. § 3326
et seq
.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 52
Description: This law provides for the conservation and improvement of areas of land affected in the
surface mining of noncoal minerals, to decrease soil erosion, to protect and maintain water supplies, and
to aid in the prevention of the pollution of rivers and streams.
Title: Oil and Gas Act, 58 P.S. § 601.101
et seq
.
Description: This law provides for (1) the regulation of the drilling and operation of oil and gas wells,
including requirements for permits, registration, distance, casing, safety, storage reservoirs, and bonding;
(2) oil and gas well inspections; (3) enforcement and penalties; and (4) the creation of an Oil and Gas
Technical Advisory Board.
Regulations
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 77, Noncoal Mining
Description: This chapter specifies the rules and regulations relating to noncoal mining activities.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 78, Oil and Gas Wells
Description: This chapter specifies procedures and rules for the drilling, alteration, operation and
plugging of oil and gas wells, including erosion and sedimentation control, discharge requirements and
PADEP’s inspection policy.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 86, Surface and Underground Coal Mining General
Description: This chapter specifies the general rules and procedures relating to coal mining activities
(surface mining; underground mining; coal preparation; and coal refuse disposal activities as defined in
this chapter).
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 87, Surface Mining of Coal
Description: This chapter identifies certain specific procedures and rules for those who engage in surface
coal mining activities whereby coal is extracted from the earth or from waste or stock piles or from pits
or banks by removing the strata or material which overlies or is above or between the coal or otherwise
exposing and retrieving the coal from the surface.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 88, Anthracite Coal
Description: This chapter specifies the rules and procedures relating to operations handling anthracite
coal or anthracite coal-related material, including, but not limited to, surface mining, the surface affected
by underground mining, bank recovery and reclamation, coal refuse disposal and coal preparation plant
activity, except when an operation is specifically modified or exempted from this definition.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 89, Underground Mining of Coal and Coal Preparation Facilities Description:
This chapter specifies the rules and procedures for those who engage in underground coal mining
activities, coal preparation activities, and in situ processing of coal (those activities on the surface or
underground which involve in-place processing and removal of coal or coal by-products).
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 90, Coal Refuse Disposal
Description: This chapter specifies certain rules and procedures for those persons who engage in the
disposal of any waste coal and related materials associated with or near a coal seam, which are either
brought aboveground or otherwise removed from a coal mine in the process of mining coal or which are
separated from coal during the cleaning or preparation operations.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 53
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 91, General Provisions
Description: This chapter specifies (1) general provisions relating to agreements with other states and
agencies; (2) specific provisions relating to PADEP’s activities in administration and enforcement,
applications and permits, and standards for approval of comprehensive water quality management
projects; and (3) miscellaneous provisions relating to consultants and analyses of wastes.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 92, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
Description: This chapter specifies the rules and procedures for obtaining an NPDES point source
discharge permit under PA’s federally-delegated program under Section 402 of the federal Clean Water
Act, including the application for permits, approval of applications, permittee monitoring, permit
conditions, and miscellaneous related provisions.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 93, Water Quality Standards
Description: This chapter sets forth water quality standards for the waters of the Commonwealth
(including wetlands) which (1) are based upon water uses to be protected, and (2) will be considered by
PADEP in its regulation of discharges.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 94, Municipal Wasteload Management
Description: This chapter specifies the rules and procedures for owners and operators of sewerage
facilities to follow to manage wasteloads discharged to their facilities in order to prevent or correct
overloads, prevent the introduction of interfering pollutants, and improve opportunities for
recycling/reclaiming wastewaters and sludges.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 95, Wastewater Treatment Requirements
Description: This chapter specifies the rules and procedures relating to general and specific wastewater
treatment requirements and changes thereto; waste load allocations; extensions of time to achieve water
quality based effluent limitations; and effective disinfection.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 97, Industrial Wastes
Description: This chapter specifies the rules and procedures that apply to the discharge of industrial
wastes to waters of the Commonwealth, either directly, or indirectly by means of discharge to a publicly
owned treatment works.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 101, Special Water Pollution Regulations
Description: This chapter contains special provisions relating to incidents causing or threatening
pollution; activities utilizing polluting substances; impoundments; use of algaecides, herbicides and fish
control chemicals; protection of Lake Wallenpaupack; and pollution control and prevention from
agricultural operations.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 102, Erosion Control
Description: This chapter imposes requirements on earthmoving activities which create accelerated
erosion or a danger of accelerated erosion and which require planning and implementation of effective
soil conservation measures to prevent the pollution of the waters of the Commonwealth from sediment
and from fertilizers, pesticides, and other polluting substances carried by sediment.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 105, Dam Safety and Waterway Management
Description: This chapter specifies the rules and procedures for the comprehensive regulation and
supervision of dams, reservoirs, water obstructions and encroachments in the Commonwealth to protect

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 54
the health, safety, welfare and property of the people and to conserve and protect the water quality,
natural regime and carrying capacity of watercourses.
Guidance Documents
Document code 012-1920-001
Title: Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance
Description: This guidance document identifies the procedures PADEP will follow to improve public
access to information and decision-making in the Department and to ensure that all guidance documents
and regulations are developed with effective participation by the public during all steps in the process.
Document code 361-0100-003
Title: Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy
Description: This strategy provides a consistent, statewide approach for addressing the USEPA priority
pollutants and other pollutants with known or suspected toxic impacts under the NPDES program and is
based on the Toxics Management Policy statement in Chapter l6 of PADEP’s regulations.
Document code 362-0300-001
Title: Domestic Wastewater Facilities Manual
Description: This manual serves as a guide to those persons responsible for the discharge of treated
domestic wastewater and sets forth information regarding (1) PADEP’s responsibilities and functions
under the Clean Streams Law, (2) the procedure for obtaining permits for discharge and for construction
and operation of treatment facilities, and (3) detailed technical guidance for consultants and engineers.
Document code 362-0300-002.
Title: Small Flow Sewage Treatment Facility Manual
Description: This manual provides guidelines for the design, installation and operation of sewage
treatment plants with domestic type sewage flows not exceeding 2000 gallons per day and also describes
sewage facilities planning and permitting requirements.
Document code 362-0300-004
Title: Industrial Waste Management
Description: This manual serves as a guide to the (1) requirements and procedures for obtaining permits
and other approvals for industrial waste management systems and discharges in PA, and (2) planning and
design of such systems.
Document code 362-0300-005
Title: NPDES Permit Handbook for POTW and Non-Municipal Wastewater Dischargers
Description: This supplemental guide serves as a companion to the NPDES permit and is designed to
help NPDES permittees in understanding and complying with the terms and conditions of their Publicly-
Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) and Non-Municipal NPDES permits.
Document code 362-0300-006
Title: NPDES Permit Handbook for Industrial Wastewater Dischargers
Description: This supplemental guide serves as a companion to the NPDES permit and is designed to
help NPDES permittees in understanding and complying with the terms and conditions of their Industrial
Wastewater Discharge NPDES permits.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 55
Document code 362-0400-001
Title: Technical Guidance for the Development and Specification of Effluent Limitations and Other
Permit Conditions in NPDES Permits
Description: This guidance helps permit writers develop accurate effluent limits and other permit
conditions that are consistent on a statewide basis, and helps the regulated community understand how
permits are developed.
Document code 362-0600-001
Title: NPDES Program Implementation - Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Concerning Water
Quality Management, NPDES Program Implementation, and Related Matters
Description: This MOU between the Bureaus of Water Quality Management (now Water Quality
Protection) and Mining and Reclamation establishes procedures for NPDES program coordination and
efficiency in regulating discharges from mining activities.
Document code 362-0600-002
Title: Agreement/Oil and Gas and Water Quality on Pollution Discharge Issues
Description: This MOU between the Bureaus of Water Quality Management (now Water Quality
Protection) and Oil and Gas Management establishes procedures for NPDES program coordination and
efficiency in regulating discharges from oil and gas exploration and development activities.
Document code 362-2000-001
Title: Permitting Policy and Procedure Manual
Description: This manual describes PADEP policies and procedures for (1) applying for NPDES (Part I)
and Water Quality Management (Part II) permits for wastewater discharges, and (2) reviewing and
processing permit applications.
Document code 362-2183-003
Title: Technology-Based Control Requirements for Water Treatment Plant Wastes
Description: This guidance (1) helps PADEP staff develop accurate and consistent limits and other
permit conditions, (2) helps the regulated community understand how permits are developed, and (3)
ensures effluent limits are consistent across the state.
Document code 362-2183-004
Title: Technical Guidance for Development of NPDES Permit Requirements - Steam Electric Industry
Description: This guidance (1) helps PADEP staff develop accurate and consistent limits and other
permit conditions, (2) helps the regulated community understand how permits are developed, and (3)
ensures effluent limits are consistent across the state.
Document code 363-2134-008
Title: Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Manual
Description: This manual provides guidance and procedures to help those engaged in earthmoving
activities and in the preparation of erosion and sediment control plans to comply with Chapter 102 rules
and regulations.
Document code 391-2000-002
Title: Implementation Guidance for Establishment of Alternative Thermal Effluent Limitations

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 56
Description: This guidance describes procedures to follow for requesting and evaluating alternative
thermal effluent limitations in accordance with Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act and Section
97.82(a)(2) of PADEP’s regulations.
Document code 391-2000-003
Title: Implementation Guidance for Determining Water Quality Based Point Source Effluent Limitations
Description: This guidance describes the analysis method for determining water quality based effluent
limitations when intensive stream survey data is not available.
Document code 391-2000-006
Title: Implementation Guidance Design Conditions
Description: This guidance provides a description of methods for determining design conditions
(including temperature, pH, and hardness) used in establishing effluent limitations for NPDES point
source discharges to provide a minimum 99% level of protection.
Document code 391-2000-007
Title: Implementation Guidance for the Water Quality Analysis Model 6.3
Description: This guidance describes the computer model used to determine recommended water quality
based effluent limits for carbonaceous BOD and Ammonia Nitrogen for single and multiple point source
discharge scenarios.
Document code 391-2000-010
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 95.6 Phosphorus Discharges to Lakes, Ponds, and
Impoundments
Description: This document provides guidance on the implementation of Section 95.6 of PADEP’s
regulations using empirical lake models to estimate phosphorus loadings which will result in an
appropriate level of water quality protection or improvement, considering existing point and non-point
sources of phosphorus.
Document code 391-2000-011
Title: Technical Reference Guide for the PA Single Discharge Toxics Model
Description: This guide describes the technical methods incorporated into PENTOXSD (PA’s Single
Discharge Toxics Model) and how these methods are applied to available data to determine
recommended NPDES effluent limitations for PA’s Single Discharge Wasteload Allocation (WLA)
Program for toxics and other substances based on water quality criteria and other instructions in
PADEP’s Chapters 93, 95, and 16 (Statement of Policy).
Document code 391-2000-012
Title: Users Guide for the PA Single Discharge Toxics Model
Description: This guide describes how applicable regulatory requirements and technical methods are
incorporated into PENTOXSD, and how the model is used to determine recommended NPDES effluent
limitations for PA’s Single Discharge Waste Load Allocation (WLA) program for toxics and other
substances based on water quality criteria and other instructions in PADEP’s Chapters 93, 95, and 16
(Statement of Policy).
Document code 391-2000-013
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 93.7 Ammonia Criteria

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 57
Description: This guidance is designed to implement PADEP’s Section 93.7 water quality criteria
regulation for Ammonia using the Water Quality Analysis Model (WQAM version 6.3).
Document code 391-2000-014
Title: Implementation Guidance for Evaluating Wastewater Discharges to Drainage Ditches and Swales.
Description: This guidance provides information for evaluating proposals involving wastewater
discharges to drainage ditches and swales where, in the absence of a wastewater discharge, stream flows
are normally zero.
Document code 391-2000-015
Title: Implementation Guidance for the Total Residual Chlorine (TRC) Regulation
Description: This document provides guidance for implementation of PADEP’s Section 93.5(f) Total
Residual Chlorine (TRC) regulation.
Document code 391-2000-017
Title: Implementation Guidance for Temperature Criteria
Description: This guidance details the procedures for calculating thermal effluent limits for both the Case
1 (withdrawal from receiving stream) and Case 2 (withdrawal from other than the receiving stream)
situations, based on the principles of heat transfer.
Document code 391-2000-018
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 95.9 Phosphorus Discharges to Free Flowing Streams
Description: This guidance implements PADEP’s Section 95.9 regulation and provides screening
procedures and methodologies for determining the need for and level of phosphorus controls to streams
which do not flow into impoundments, or those which flow into impoundments with an average annual
detention time of less than 14 days.
Document code 391-2000-019
Title: Implementation Guidance for Application of Section 93.5(e) for Potable Water Supply Protection
Description: This document provides guidance on the protection of potable water supplies when any
discharge (existing or proposed) contains one or more of the pollutants (Total Dissolved Solids, Nitrite-
Nitrogen, Non-Priority Pollutant Phenolics, Fluoride) specified in PADEP’s Section 93.5(e) regulation.
Document code 391-2000-020
Title: Protocol for Estimating First Order Pollutant Fate Coefficients for Volatile Organic Substances
Description: This document identifies procedures (non-mandatory) recommended or used by PADEP
staff for field data collection and evaluation of data for volatile organic substances.
Document code 391-3200-008
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Advanced Treatment - Model Calibration/Verification Surveys
Description: This guidance establishes and standardizes PADEP’s procedures for conducting model
calibration surveys, as needed, to determine proper effluent limits for proposed advanced treatment
projects.
Document code 391-3200-010
Title: Standardized Biological Field Collection and Laboratory Methods
Description: This guidance establishes and standardizes PADEP’s procedures for the collection and
analysis of biological data for the purpose of evaluating the condition of PA’s aquatic resources.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 58
Document code 391-3200-013
Title: Evaluation of Phosphorus Discharges to Lakes, Ponds and Impoundments
Description: This guidance establishes procedures for PADEP staff to conduct studies to evaluate the
impact of phosphorus sources on the trophic state of an impounded water body with a detention time of
14 days or greater as part of PA’s quality assurance plan.
Document code 550-0300-001
Title: Oil and Gas Operators Manual
Description: The purpose of this manual is to provide a broad overview of the statutes, regulations and
recommended practices relating to the oil and gas industry and is designed primarily for use by persons
working in the industry as well as citizen groups and governmental personnel.
Document code 550-2100-002
Title: Oil and Gas Wastewater Permitting Manual
Description: This manual is a guide to oil and gas operators in obtaining NPDES permits Part I (for
surface water discharges), Part II (Construction/Operation for treatment facilities or activities which
discharge wastewater to surface or ground water), and Part II (Disposal Well Construction and
Operation for subsurface injection of brine).
Document code 560-0700-304
Title: Review of Surface Mine Applications on High Quality Waters
Description: This document outlines the procedures for PADEP staff to follow in reviewing surface mine
permit applications proposing new or increased discharges of industrial waste or other pollutants from
surface mining of coal or noncoal (industrial minerals) to waters classified as High Quality Waters in
Chapter 93, including the informational needs and evaluation criteria for reviewing social and economic
justification proposals for such discharges.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: Article I (Declaration of Rights), Section 27 (Natural Resources and the Public Estate)
states that, “The people have a right to clean air, pure water, and to the preservation of the natural,
scenic, historic and esthetic values of the environment. Pennsylvania’s public natural resources are the
common property of all the people, including generations yet to come. As trustee of these resources, the
Commonwealth shall conserve and maintain them for the benefit of all the people.”
Title: Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy - Statement of Policy (25 PA Code Chapter 16)
Description: This statement of policy (1) lists the federal Clean Water Act Section 307(a) priority
pollutants and other toxic substances which PADEP determines to be of concern due to their verified
presence in wastewater discharges, (2) specifies guidelines and procedures for development of criteria
for toxic substances, and (3) lists those toxic criteria which have been developed to date.
Title: PA Process for Preparation and Submission of TMDLs for Low Flow Conditions
Description: This document outlines what information PADEP will submit with its current water quality
protection reports for all single discharge TMDLs for low flow to USEPA for its review and approval
(Oct 28, 1997; updated Jan 7, 1998).

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 59
Title: NPDES Memorandum of Agreement between Commonwealth of PA and USEPA
Description: This June 26, 1991 MOA (1) establishes policies, responsibilities and procedures pursuant
to 40 CFR Part 123, and defines the manner in which the federally-delegated NPDES program will be
administered by PADER (now PADEP) and reviewed by USEPA Region III, and (2) replaces the MOA
between the Department and USEPA approved June 30, 1978.
Title: Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO) Strategy
Description: This strategy describes the methods to be used to control the water quality impacts of
manure from concentrated animal feeding operations in PA to comply with the CAFO requirements of the
federal Clean Water Act.
b.
130.5(b)(2) Process for incorporating elements of applicable areawide waste treatment plans under
Section 208 and basin management plans under Section 209 of the Clean Water Act
The processes described in the following documents are used by PADEP to incorporate applicable waste
treatment and basin management plans into PA’s overall water quality management program.
Statutes
Title: Clean Streams Law
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Sewage Facilities Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: PA Infrastructure Investment Authority Act, 35 P.S.§ 751.1
et seq
.
Description: This law provides for the establishment, implementation and administration of the PA
Infrastructure Investment Authority, and imposes powers and duties on a board of directors, including (1)
establishing a Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund administered in accordance with the requirements
of Section 212 of the federal Clean Water Act of 1987, (2) establishing other revolving and nonrevolving
funds and accounts as necessary or convenient, (3) providing for financial assistance for eligible water
and sewage and storm water projects, and (4) assigning priorities for eligible projects in consultation with
the Departments of Commerce (now Community and Economic Development) and Environmental
Protection and based on various factors, including any requirements of federal law imposed on the use of
federal funds.
Title: Nutrient Management Act, 3 P.S. § 1704(1)
Description: This law provides for (1) management of nutrients on certain agricultural operations to
abate nonpoint source pollution, (2) certification of nutrient management specialists, (3) assessment of
other nonpoint sources of nutrient pollution, (4) establishment of a Nutrient Management Advisory Board
and Nutrient Management Fund, and (5) and enforcement and penalty provisions.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 60
Title: Transportation (74 PA. C.S.) and Vehicle Code (75 PA. C.S.) - Amend Act of 1997, P.L. 6, No. 3
Description: Section 91.06. Dirt and Gravel Road Maintenance. It is the intent and purpose of this
section to:
1. To fund safe, efficient and environmentally sound maintenance of sections of dirt and gravel roads
which have been identified as sources of dust and sediment pollution.
2. To establish a dedicated and earmarked funding mechanism that provides streamlined appropriation to
the county level and enables local officials to establish fiscal and environmental controls.
Regulations
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 71, Administration of Sewage Facilities Planning Program
Description: This chapter (1) applies to municipalities, local agencies and delegated agencies
administering the planning provisions of the Sewage Facilities Act, and (2) governs the sewage planning
requirements for sewage facilities being proposed by municipalities to (a) resolve existing sewage
disposal problems, (b) provide for the sewage disposal needs of new land development, and (c) provide
for future sewage disposal needs of a resident or landowner in a municipality.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 83, State Conservation Commission
Description: This chapter specifies the rules and procedures relating to the Commission’s Conservation
District Fund Allocation Program, Chesapeake Bay Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement Program, and
Nutrient Management and Funding Program.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 93
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: 25 Pa. Code Chapter 961, PA Infrastructure Investment Authority Guidelines
Description: This chapter provides guidelines of the Board of Directors of the Authority relating to
applicant eligibility, financial assistance criteria, application procedures (including the roles of the
Departments of Environmental Protection and Commerce [now Community and Economic Development]
in this process), project evaluation criteria and eligible/ineligible costs.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 963, PA Infrastructure Investment Authority Assistance
Description: This chapter establishes procedures and criteria for awarding financial assistance under the
PA Infrastructure Investment Authority Act and applies to owners and operators of water, wastewater
and stormwater facilities who apply for financial assistance.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 965, Clean Water State Revolving Fund
Description: This chapter establishes procedures and criteria that apply to governmental units which own
or will own sewerage facilities and to governmental units or private individuals who are constructing or
maintaining nonpoint source projects or estuary protection projects and who apply for financial assistance
under the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (the funding account established in accordance with the
requirements of the PA Infrastructure Investment Authority Act and the federal Clean Water Act for the
purpose of establishing an environmental infrastructure revolving loan program).
Guidance Documents
Document code 012-0700-002

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 61
Title: Guidance for Implementation of the Agricultural Land Preservation Policy
Description: This guidance provides direction to PADEP staff for the execution of their duties and
through the administration of PADEP’s current programs and regulations to (1) prevent the irreversible
loss of primary agricultural land, and (2) administer PADEP’s programs so that PADEP funds or
PADEP-administered federal funds are not used to encourage the conversion of “primary agricultural
land” to other uses when feasible alternatives are available.
Document code 012-0800-001
Title: Quality Management Plan
Description: This plan provides the overall quality assurance program framework and management
system necessary to assure that data generated by or for the Department are of acceptable quality to meet
the needs of users and decision-makers.
Document code 012-1920-001
Title: Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 361-0100-002
Title: Statement of Policy - Chesapeake Bay Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement Program
Description: This policy identifies the procedures the State Conservation Commission will follow to
encourage and promote better land management practices within the agricultural community through a
comprehensive program to (1) demonstrate new land management techniques, (2) foster new land
management attitudes, (3) furnish technical expertise, and (4) provide financial assistance to landowners
for the installation of BMPs to control nonpoint sources of pollution in the Chesapeake Bay Basin in PA.
Document code 362-0300-003
Title: Sewage Facilities Planning: A Guide for Preparing Act 537 Update Revisions
Description: This technical guidance provides municipal officials and their consultants with a general
description of the Act 537 Sewage Facilities Plan update revision process and shows how the plan can be
used as a tool to resolve existing sewage disposal problems and to prevent new ones from occurring.
Document code 362-2206-001
Title: Review and Coordination of Chapter 94 Reports and Act 537 Planning
Description: This document describes how PADEP plans and coordinates its Municipal Wasteload
Management Program under Chapter 94 with Chapter 71 of its Act 537 Sewage Facilities Planning
Program.
Document code 362-2206-007
Title: Policy Establishing New Program Direction for Act 537 Comprehensive Planning
Description: This policy document describes how PADEP will (1) help rural municipalities and their
consultants find practical, affordable solutions to their existing and newly discovered sewage problems
that will protect public health and the environment, and (2) assist them in finding the funding necessary to
implement these solutions.
Document code 362-2208-002
Title: Municipal Guidance - Reconstructive Planning

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 62
Description: This document provides guidance to municipalities to facilitate completion of sewage
facilities planning requirements when an application for an onlot sewage disposal system permit is
received for existing lots having no sewage facilities planning approval.
Document code 362-5512-002
Title: Act 537 Sewage Facilities Planning Grants
Description: This guidance describes the application review process conducted by PADEP staff to
determine eligible expenditures of municipalities applying for Act 537 planning grants.
Document code 363-0200-001
Title: Wetlands Protection Action Plan
Description: This guidance establishes PADEP’s goals for wetlands protection and sets forth a plan of
action to obtain these goals.
Document code 381-5511-013
Title: A State Environmental Review Process for Pennsylvania
Description: This document outlines the process PADEP staff follows in complying with the federal
requirement that all projects funded from the PENNVEST Clean Water State Revolving Fund complete
an environmental review and select the alternative that is technically, environmentally and economically
sound.
Document code 394-0300-001
Title: PA Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program and Final Environmental Impact Statement
Description: This document describes the federally approved Pennsylvania CZM Program and provides
guidance to all levels of government, the general public and others to ensure that their activities affecting
PA’s coastal zones will be undertaken in a manner consistent with the policies of the CZM Program.
Document code 394-2000-002
Title: Pennsylvania’s Nonpoint Source (NPS) Management Program 1999 Update.
Description: This document updates Pennsylvania’s Nonpoint Source Management Program approved
by EPA in 1992. The 1999 Update incorporates the Clean Water Action Plan, EPA’s Nine Key Elements
of an Effective State Program, Pennsylvania’s Watershed Approach, and provides direction for
Pennsylvania’s Nonpoint Source Program over the next four years and beyond.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Governor’s Executive Order 1997-6 (10/14/97) - Agricultural Land Preservation Policy
Description: This Order (1) specifies the policy of the Commonwealth to protect, through the
administration of all agency programs and regulations, the Commonwealth’s primary agricultural land
from irreversible conversion to uses that result in its loss as an environmental and essential food and fiber
resource, and (2) establishes an interagency committee, chaired by the PA Department of Agriculture (the
lead agency for implementing this policy) to solve mutual problems in meeting the objectives of this
Order.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 63
Title: Governor’s Executive Order 1999-1 (1/7/99) - Land Use Planning
Description: This Order specifies (1) the land use goals of the Commonwealth to guide all
Commonwealth agencies when making decisions that impact the use of land in PA, and (2) the roles and
responsibilities of the (a) Governor’s Center for Local Government Services as the principal state entity
responsible for land use assistance and monitoring; (b) Governor’s Green Government Council as the
environmental performance manager of state government operations; and (c) Department of
Environmental Protection in establishing a statewide geographic information system for sharing common
geospatial data among state agencies and local governments.
Title: Strategy for Assessing Pennsylvania’s Unassessed Surface Waters
Description: This strategy describes the process and protocols used by PADEP to assess the water
quality of Pennsylvania’s unassessed free-flowing surface waters and publicly owned lakes.
c.
130.5(b)(3) Process for developing total maximum daily loads and individual water quality based
effluent limits
Water quality limited segments are those streams or portions of streams where it is known that water
quality does not meet applicable water quality standards and/or is not expected to meet applicable water
quality standards after the application of secondary treatment or best practicable treatment. The pollution
sources affecting this category can be point sources or nonpoint sources, or both. The processes
described in the following documents are used by PADEP to manage TMDL development issues and
develop water quality based effluent limits.
Statutes
Title: Clean Streams Law
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Oil and Gas Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Regulations
Title: 25 PA Code Chapters 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 97, 101.
Description: See previous write-ups.
Guidance Documents
Document code 012-1920-001
Title: Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 64
Document code 361-0100-002
Title: Statement of Policy - Chesapeake Bay Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement Program
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 361-0100-003
Title: Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0300-001
Title: Domestic Wastewater Facilities Manual
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0300-004
Title: Industrial Waste Management
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0300-005
Title: NPDES Permit Handbook for POTW and Non-Municipal Wastewater Dischargers
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0300-006
Title: NPDES Permit Handbook for Industrial Wastewater Dischargers
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0400-001
Title: Technical Guidance for the Development and Specification of Effluent Limitations and Other
Permit Conditions in NPDES Permits
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0600-001
Title: NPDES Program Implementation - Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Concerning Water
Quality Management, NPDES Program Implementation, and Related Matters
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0600-002
Title: Agreement/Oil and Gas and Water Quality on Pollution Discharge Issues
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-2000-001
Title: Permitting Policy and Procedure Manual
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-2183-004
Title: Technical Guidance for Development of NPDES Permit Requirements - Steam Electric Industry
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 65
Document code 363-2134-008
Title: Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Manual
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-002
Title: Implementation Guidance for Establishment of Alternate Thermal Effluent Limitations
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-003
Title: Implementation Guidance for Determining Water Quality Based Point Source Effluent Limitations
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-006
Title: Implementation Guidance Design Conditions
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-007
Title: Implementation Guidance for the Water Quality Analysis Model 6.3
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-010
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 95.6 Phosphorus Discharges to Lakes, Ponds, and
Impoundments
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-011
Title: Technical Reference Guide for the PA Single Discharge Toxics Model
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-012
Title: Users Guide for the PA Single Discharge Toxics Model
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-013
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 93.7 Ammonia Criteria
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-014
Title: Implementation Guidance for Evaluating Wastewater Discharges to Drainage Ditches and Swales
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-015
Title: Implementation Guidance for the Total Residual Chlorine (TRC) Regulation
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-017
Title: Implementation Guidance for Temperature Criteria
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 66
Document code 391-2000-018
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 95.9 Phosphorus Discharges to Free Flowing Streams
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-019
Title: Implementation Guidance for Application of Section 93.5(e) for Potable Water Supply Protection
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-020
Title: Protocol for Estimating First Order Pollutant Fate Coefficients for Volatile Organic Substances
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-002
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Ambient Fixed Station/Water Quality Network Monitoring
Description: This guidance establishes and standardizes PADEP’s procedures for conducting water
quality monitoring at PA’s Ambient Fixed Station Network in order to establish and maintain a database
designed to assess the quality of PA’s surface waters and the effectiveness of PA’s water quality
management program.
Document code 391-3200-003
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Cause/Effect Surveys
Description: This guidance establishes and standardizes PADEP’s procedures for conducting
cause/effect surveys, as needed, to identify waters affected by pollution sources and to investigate causes
of the observed water quality impairments.
Document code 391-3200-004
Title: Aquatic Life - Use Attainability Studies for Flowing and Impounded Water Bodies
Description: This guidance establishes and standardizes PADEP’s procedures for determining if
protected aquatic life uses are being attained in flowing and impounded waters.
Document code 391-3200-005
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Aquatic Life Special Water Quality Protection Surveys
Description: This guidance establishes and standardizes PADEP’s procedures for (1) conducting aquatic
life stream surveys, and (2) evaluations of chemical, physical and biological data collected for use in
reviewing and revising, if necessary, water quality standards to ensure (a) that outstanding water
resources are afforded special water quality protection, and (b) maintenance of existing quality.
Document code 391-3200-006
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Toxics Surveys
Description: This guidance establishes and standardizes PADEP’s procedures for conducting aquatic
surveys, as needed, to identify waters affected by toxics.
Document code 391-3200-007
Title: Stream Enrichment Risk Analysis
Description: This guidance establishes and standardizes PADEP’s procedures for conducting stream
surveys and related risk analyses to determine the need for an appropriate level of phosphorus controls

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 67
for free flowing streams and streams tributary to impoundments with an average annual detention time of
less than 14 days.
Document code 391-3200-008
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Advanced Treatment - Model Calibration/Verification Surveys
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-010
Title: Standardized Biological Field Collection and Laboratory Methods
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-013
Title: Evaluation of Phosphorus Discharges to Lakes, Ponds and Impoundments
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 394-0300-001
Title: PA Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program and Final Environmental Impact Statement
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 394-2000-002
Title: Pennsylvania’s Nonpoint Source (NPS) Management Program 1999 Update
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 550-0300-001
Title: Oil and Gas Operators Manual
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 560-0700-304
Title: Review of Surface Mine Applications on High Quality Waters
Description: See previous write-up.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: PA Process for Preparation and Submission of TMDLs for Low Flow Conditions
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: NPDES Memorandum of Agreement between Commonwealth of PA and USEPA
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 68
d.
130.5(b)(4) Process for updating and maintaining water quality management plans
The processes described in the following documents are used by PADEP to update and maintain water
quality management plans.
Statutes
Title: Clean Streams Law
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Sewage Facilities Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Nutrient Management Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Regulations
Title: 25 PA Code Chapters 71, 83, 93
Description: See previous write-ups.
Guidance Documents
Document code 012-0700-002
Title: Guidance for Implementation of the Agricultural Land Preservation Policy
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 012-1920-001
Title: Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 361-0100-002
Title: Statement of Policy - Chesapeake Bay Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement Program
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-5512-002
Title: Act 537 Sewage Facilities Planning Grants
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 363-0200-001
Title: Wetlands Protection Action Plan
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-002
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Ambient Fixed Station/Water Quality Network Monitoring
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 69
Document code 391-3200-003
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Cause/Effect Surveys
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-004
Title: Aquatic Life - Use Attainability Studies for Flowing and Impounded Water Bodies
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-005
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Aquatic Life Special Water Quality Protection Surveys
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-006
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Toxics Surveys
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-007
Title: Stream Enrichment Risk Analysis
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-013
Title: Evaluation of Phosphorus Discharges to Lakes, Ponds and Impoundments
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 394-0300-001
Title: PA Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program and Final Environmental Impact Statement
Description: See previous write-up.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Section 303(d) List of Waters
Description: This document, in accordance with Section 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act, identifies
PA water bodies that need Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) to assure compliance with water
quality standards; describes PADEP’s watershed permitting process; addresses short and long term
watershed permitting strategies; incorporates a generalized TMDL submittal process; provides for
watershed permitting schedules; and must be submitted to USEPA by April 1 of even-numbered years.
Title: Pennsylvania’s Comprehensive Plan for Abandoned Mine Reclamation
Description: This plan establishes a framework for organizing reclamation efforts, for coordinating
among those involved in reclamation activities, for prioritizing expenditures and for decision-making in
order to undertake projects that have the most worth to the citizens of the Commonwealth.
Title: Strategy for Assessing Pennsylvania’s Unassessed Surface Waters
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 70
Title: 1998 Water Quality Assessment 305(b) Report
Description: This biennial report, prepared in accordance with Section 305(b) of the federal Clean Water
Act, provides an assessment of water quality in the Commonwealth and provides a summary of various
water quality management programs, including water quality standards and point and nonpoint source
controls.
e.
130.5(b)(5) Process for assuring adequate authority for intergovernmental cooperation in the
implementation of the State water quality management program
The processes described in the following documents are used by PADEP to develop effective lines of
communication and cooperation with other local, state and federal agencies in order to implement water
quality management programs.
Statutes
Title: Administrative Code of 1929, 71 P.S. § 51
et seq
.
Description: This law (1) specifies the conduct of the executive and administrative work of the
Commonwealth by the Executive Department and the administrative departments and their related
boards, commissions and officers, and (2) defines the powers and duties of the Governor and other
executive and administrative officers and the administrative departments, boards, commissions and
officers, including the Department of Environmental Resources as created by an amendment to the Code
dated December 3, 1970 (P.L. 834, No. 275, 71 P.S. § 510-1).
Title: Conservation and Natural Resources Act, 71 P.S. § 1340.101
et seq
.
Description: This law, effective July 1. 1995, created the Department of Conservation and Natural
Resources, renamed the Department of Environmental Resources to Environmental Protection, and
defined the powers, duties, functions and rulemaking authority of each agency.
Title: Clean Streams Law
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Sewage Facilities Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Noncoal Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act, 52 P.S. § 3326
et seq
.
Description: This law provides for the conservation and improvement of areas of land affected in the
surface mining of noncoal minerals, to decrease soil erosion, to protect and maintain water supplies, and
to aid in the prevention of the pollution of rivers and streams.
Title: PA Infrastructure Investment Authority Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Conservation District Law, 3 P.S. § 849
et seq
.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 71
Description: This law relates to the conservation of soil, water and related natural resources and land use
practices contributing to soil wastage and erosion and (1) provides for the organization of the various
counties into conservation districts, and (2) creates the State Conservation Commission with powers and
duties to administer this law.
Title: PA Fish and Boat Code, 30 Pa. C.S. § 322
et seq
.
Description: This law specifies the organization of the PA Fish and Boat Commission and outlines its
powers and duties, including (1) the protection of property and water and (2) enforcement.
Title: Nutrient Management Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Dam Safety and Encroachments Act, 32 P.S. §693.1 - 693.27
et seq
.
Description: This law provides for the regulation of dams and reservoirs, water obstructions and
encroachments to protect the natural resources, environmental rights and values secured by the PA
Constitution and to conserve the water quality, natural regime and carrying capacity of watercourses.
Title: Local Health Administration Law, 16 P.S. §§ 12001 - 12028
et seq
.
Description: This law, effective August 24, 1951, authorizes counties to create, establish and administer
single or joint county health departments, exempts certain municipalities from the jurisdiction of such
health departments, and authorizes state grants to counties and certain municipalities which establish
health departments if they meet prescribed requirements.
Regulations
Title: 25 PA Code Chapters 71, 77, 83, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 97, 102, 105, 961, 963.
Description: See previous write-ups.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 103, Financial Assistance
Description: Subpart A specifies the procedures PADEP follows in developing project priority ratings to
assist the PA Infrastructure Investment Authority (PIIA) in providing loans for municipal sewage
projects.
Title: 28 PA Code Chapter 15, State Aid to Local Health Departments
Description: This chapter sets forth the conditions under which local health departments (Municipal;
County) may receive Commonwealth grants under the Local Health Administration Law.
Title: 28 PA Code Chapter 17, Standards for Environmental Health Services
Description: This chapter applies to all local health departments which receive Commonwealth grants
under the Local Health Administration Law and sets for the minimum standards of performance for those
departments in the mandated programs in the area of Environmental Health Services, including those for
the Water Pollution Control Program.
Title: 58 PA Code Chapter 51, Administrative Provisions
Description: This chapter specifies the administrative provisions of the PA Fish and Boat Commission
under the PA Fish and Boat Code.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 72
Guidance Documents
Title: 58 PA Code Chapter 57, Statements of Policy
Description: This chapter specifies the policies adopted by the PA Fish and Boat Commission, including
those related to water quality designations, fish kills, acid precipitation, hydropower development impacts
on water quality, and enforcement.
Document code 362-0600-001
Title: NPDES Program Implementation - Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Concerning Water
Quality Management, NPDES Program Implementation, and Related Matters
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0600-002
Title: Agreement/Oil and Gas and Water Quality on Pollution Discharge Issues
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 381-5511-012
Title: Memorandum of Understanding - Between the Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP)
and the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST)
Description: This MOU delineates the responsibilities, authority, accountability and procedures for and
areas of cooperation between PADEP and PIIA regarding the implementation and administration of the
sewer, stormwater and water infrastructure funding programs authorized by the PA Infrastructure
Investment Authority Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996, and the federal Clean
Water Act of 1987.
Document code 394-0300-001
Title: PA Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program and Final Environmental Impact Statement
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 560-0600-101
Title: Memorandum of Understanding with Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission
Description: This MOU outlines procedures in which PADEP and the PFBC will cooperate in the review
of coal mining applications, monitoring and enforcement, and lands unsuitable for mining provisions
under PA’s Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act and Chapter 86 of PADEP’s regulations.
Document code 560-0600-102
Title: Memorandum of Understanding with the Pennsylvania Game Commission
Description: This MOU outlines procedures in which PADEP and the PGC will cooperate in the review
of coal mining applications, monitoring and enforcement, and lands unsuitable for mining provisions
under PA’s Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act and Chapter 86 of PADEP’s regulations.
Document code 560-0600-104
Title: Interagency Agreement with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission
Description: This document defines the duties and responsibilities of PADEP and the PHMC in
identifying, evaluating and preserving historic and archaeological resources located in areas to be
impacted by the surface mining of coal.
Document code 560-0600-105
Title: Interagency Agreement, Waste Management

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 73
Description: This MOU establishes the responsibilities of PADEP’s Bureaus of Mining and Reclamation
and Waste Management relative to solid waste disposal or utilization on permitted mining operations and
mining activities that occur on permitted solid waste disposal facilities.
Document code 560-0600-204
Title: Memorandum of Understanding between the Office of Surface Mining and the State of
Pennsylvania
Description: This MOU describes how Pennsylvania and the federal Office of Surface Mining
Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) will integrate information systems and share data in order to
implement the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977.
Document code 560-0700-302
Title: Review of Surface Mine Permit Applications by the PA Fish and Boat Commission
Description: This guidance outlines the procedures to be followed by PADEP and PFBC in the
processing of surface coal mine permit applications to ensure that such mining is conducted in a manner
that minimizes impacts on fish, critical aquatic habitats and threatened and endangered species under the
jurisdiction of the PFBC.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Governor’s Executive Order 1997-6 (10/14/97) - Agricultural Land Preservation Policy
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Governor’s Executive Order 1999-1 (1/7/99) - Land Use Planning
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Commonwealth of PA and US Environmental Protection Agency Operating Agreement for Clean
Water State Revolving Fund and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
Description: This operating agreement establishes a contractual relationship between USEPA and the
Commonwealth of PA to define and integrate rules, regulations, guidelines, policies, procedures and
activities to be followed by both parties in administering the State Revolving Fund Programs prescribed
by Title VI of the Clean Water Act of 1987 and Title I of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of
1996.
Title: Conditional Approval of the Permanent Program Submission from the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977
Description: The Federal Register (Vol. 47, No. 147) dated July 31, 1982 and related documents
describe the Secretary of Interior’s conditional approval of Pennsylvania’s permanent regulatory program
to administer and enforce the provisions of SMCRA and related federal regulations effective July 31,
1982.
Title: Memorandum of Agreement between PA Department of Environmental Resources and Office of
Surface Mining
Description: This MOA outlines the specific oversight procedures to coordinate inspection and
enforcement activities agreed upon by PADER (now PADEP) and OSM (PA Office) as part of PA’s

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 74
federally approved program to administer and enforce the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act
(P.L. 95-87) effective July 31, 1982.
Title: Pennsylvania State Programmatic General Permit PASPGP-1
Description: The PASPGP-1, dated January 17, 1995, (1) is a federal Clean Water Act Section 404
permit issued for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania indicating the Commonwealth’s Chapter 105 permit
process meets the requirements of the federal Act, and (2) authorizes, under certain conditions, the
discharge of dredged, excavated or fill material or structures into waters of the United States and the
Commonwealth, including wetlands.
f.
130.5(b)(6) Process for establishing and assuring adequate implementation of new or revised water
quality standards including schedules of compliance
Water quality standards delineate water uses that are to be protected and include general and specific
criteria for individual chemical, biological and physical quality indicators. Pennsylvania’s water quality
standards have been adopted as regulations in Chapters 92, 93, 95, 102 and 105. Water quality standards
are also found in the Statement of Policy at Chapter 16. The processes described in the following
documents are used by PADEP to establish, revise and implement water quality standards.
Statutes
Title: Clean Streams Law
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Phosphate Detergent Act, Act 31 of 1999.
Description: This act prohibits the sale, manufacture, distribution or use of certain cleaning agents
containing phosphates and confers certain powers and duties on the EQB and PADEP.
Regulations
Title: 25 PA Code Chapters 92, 93, 102, 105.
Description: See previous write-ups.
Guidance Documents
Title: 58 PA Code Chapter 57, Statements of Policy
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 012-0100-001
Title: Policy for Processing Petitions - Statement of Policy
Description: This policy identifies (1) the general procedures for processing petitions requesting the
Environmental Quality Board (EQB) to issue, amend or repeal a regulation, and (2) the specific
procedures for processing petitions relating to (a) designating an area unsuitable for mining under
Chapter 86 and (b) redesignation of streams under Chapter 93.
Document code 012-1920-001
Title: Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 75
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 361-0100-003
Title: Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0300-004
Title: Industrial Wastewater Management
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0300-005
Title: NPDES Permit Handbook for POTW and Non-Municipal Wastewater Dischargers
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0300-006
Title: NPDES Permit Handbook for Industrial Wastewater Dischargers
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0400-001
Title: Technical Guidance for the Development and Specification of Effluent Limitations and Other
Permit Conditions in NPDES Permits
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0600-001
Title: NPDES Program Implementation - Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Concerning Water
Quality Management, NPDES Program Implementation, and Related Matters
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-0600-002
Title: Agreement/Oil and Gas and Water Quality on Pollution Discharge Issues
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-2000-001
Title: Permitting Policy and Procedure Manual
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-2183-004
Title: Technical Guidance for Development of NPDES Permit Requirements - Steam Electric Industry
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 363-0200-001
Title: Wetlands Protection Action Plan
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 363-2134-008
Title: Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Manual
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 76
Document code 391-2000-002
Title: Implementation Guidance for Establishment of Alternative Thermal Effluent Limitations
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-003
Title: Implementation Guidance for Determining Water Quality Based Point Source Effluent Limitations
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-006
Title: Implementation Guidance Design Conditions
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-007
Title: Implementation Guidance for the Water Quality Analysis Model 6.3
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-010
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 95.6 Phosphorus Discharges to Lakes, Ponds, and
Impoundments
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-011
Title: Technical Reference Guide for the PA Single Discharge Toxics Model
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-012
Title: Users Guide for the PA Single Discharge Toxics Model
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-013
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 93.7 Ammonia Criteria
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-015
Title: Implementation Guidance for the Total Residual Chlorine (TRC) Regulation
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-017
Title: Implementation Guidance for Temperature Criteria
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-018
Title: Implementation Guidance for Section 95.9 Phosphorus Discharges to Free Flowing Streams
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-2000-019
Title: Implementation Guidance for Application of Section 93.5(e) for Potable Water Supply Protection
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 77
Document code 391-2000-020
Title: Protocol for Estimating First Order Pollutant Fate Coefficients for Volatile Organic Substances
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-004
Title: Aquatic Life - Use Attainability Studies for Flowing and Impounded Water Bodies
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-005
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Aquatic Life Special Water Quality Protection Surveys
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-007
Title: Stream Enrichment Risk Analysis
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-008
Title: Quality Assurance Work Plan: Advanced Treatment - Model Calibration/Verification Surveys
Description See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-010
Title: Standardized Biological Field Collection and Laboratory Methods
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 391-3200-013
Title: Evaluation of Phosphorus Discharges to Lakes, Ponds and Impoundments
Description: See previous write-up.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Water Quality Toxics Management Strategy – Statement of Policy
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: PA Process for Preparation and Submission of TMDLs for Low Flow Conditions
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: NPDES Memorandum of Agreement between Commonwealth of PA and USEPA
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Conditional Approval of the Permanent Program Submission from the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Memorandum of Agreement between PA Department of Environmental Resources and Office of
Surface Mining

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 78
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO) Strategy
Description: See previous write-up.
g.
130.5(b)(7) Process for assuring adequate controls over the disposition of residual waste from
water treatment processing
The processes described in the following documents are used by PADEP to assure adequate controls
over the disposition of residual waste from water treatment processing.
Statutes
Title: Clean Streams Law
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Solid Waste Management Act, 35 P.S. § 6018.101
et seq
.
Description: This act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection,
transportation, processing, treatment and disposal, and authorizes the Department of Environmental
Resources (now PADEP) to adopt rules, regulations, standards and procedures for implementing the act.
Regulations
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 105
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 287, Residual Waste Management
Description: This chapter specifies (1) general procedures and rules for persons or municipalities who
generate, manage or handle residual waste (Garbage, refuse, other discarded material or other waste,
including solid, liquid, semisolid or contained gaseous materials resulting from industrial, mining and
agricultural operations and sludge from an industrial, mining or agricultural water supply treatment
facility, wastewater treatment facility or air pollution control facility, if it is not hazardous), and (2)
specifies PADEP’s requirements for residual waste processing, disposal, transportation, collection and
storage.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 288, Residual Waste Landfills
Description: This chapter sets forth application and operating requirements for residual waste landfills in
addition to the applicable general provisions contained in Chapter 287.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 289, Residual Waste Disposal Impoundments
Description: This chapter sets forth application and operating requirements for residual waste disposal
impoundments in addition to the applicable general provisions contained in Chapter 287.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 291, Land Application of Residual Waste
Description: This chapter sets forth application and operating requirements for land application of
residual waste in addition to the applicable general provisions contained in Chapter 287.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 79
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 297, Incinerators and Other Processing Facilities
Description: This chapter sets forth application and operating requirements for residual waste processing
facilities (other than transfer or composting facilities) in addition to the applicable general provisions
contained in Chapter 287.
Title: 25 PA Code Chapter 299, Storage and Transportation of Residual Waste
Description: This chapter sets forth standards for residual waste storage (including storage at
impoundments that are permitted for industrial wastewater, pretreatment, treatment or storage and
discharge under the Clean Streams Law), collection and transportation in addition to the applicable
general provisions contained in Chapter 287.
Guidance Documents
Document code 012-1920-001
Title: Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 258-2000-764
Title: New Waste Streams Reviews
Description: This document provides guidance to PADEP staff in the review of applications from
persons or municipalities owning or operating PADEP-regulated waste management facilities and seeking
PADEP approval to receive residual waste streams.
Document code 258-2000-765
Title: General Permitting Procedure
Description: This document establishes a consistent and uniform process for PADEP staff to follow in
reviewing applications from persons or municipalities seeking general permits for the processing of
residual waste to be beneficially used.
Document code 258-2100-769
Title: Coproduct Determinations in the Residual Waste Program
Description: This document establishes a policy for use in evaluating coproduct determinations for
materials which, if wastes, would be regulated as residual waste only under PA’s Residual Waste
Management Program.
Document code 362-0400-001
Title: Technical Guidance for the Development and Specification of Effluent Limitations and Other
Permit Conditions in NPDES Permits
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-2000-001
Title: Permitting Policy and Procedure Manual
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 362-2183-003
Title: Technology-Based Control Requirements for Water Treatment Plant Wastes
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 80
Document code 383-2125-108
Title: Public Water Supply Manual, Part II: Community System Design Standards.
Description: This manual provides detailed design and construction standards for all community water
systems (except bottled water systems, bulk water haulers, vended water systems and retail water
facilities) and also contains instructions for submitting a public water system permit application to
PADEP.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: See previous write-up.
h.
130.5(b)(8) Process for developing an inventory and ranking the need for construction of waste
treatment works
The processes described in the following documents are used by PADEP to determine the need for
construction of waste treatment works.
Statutes
Title: Clean Streams Law
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Sewage Facilities Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: PA Infrastructure Investment Authority Act
Description: See previous write-up.
Regulations
Title: 25 PA Code Chapters 103, 961, 963, 965
Description: See previous write-ups.
Guidance Documents
Document code 012-1920-001
Title: Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 381-5511-012
Title: Memorandum of Understanding between the Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP)
and the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST)
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 81
Document code 381-5511-113
Title: Handbook for PENNVEST Wastewater Projects
Description: This document provides guidance and procedures to PADEP staff in carrying out their
responsibilities during the planning, rating, design and construction of wastewater projects to be funded
by PENNVEST in accordance with applicable state and federal requirements.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Commonwealth of PA and US Environmental Protection Agency Operating Agreement for Clean
Water State Revolving Fund and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
Description: See previous write-up.
i.
130.5(b)(9) Process for determining the priority of permit issuance
The processes described in the following documents are used by PADEP to determine the priority of
permit issuance.
Statutes
Title: Clean Streams Law
Description: See previous write-up.
Guidance Documents
Document code 012-1920-001
Title: Public Participation in the Development of Regulations and Technical Guidance
Description: See previous write-up.
Document code 013-2000-001
Title: Policy for Implementing the DEP Money-Back Guarantee Permit Review Program
Description: This document provides guidance and a uniform process for PADEP staff to implement
Executive Order 1995-5 which (1) establishes processing times for certain PADEP permits, and (2)
provides for refunds of permit processing fees if the Department fails to meet published processing times.
Other Documents
Title: Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Section 303(d) List of Waters
Description: See previous write-up.
Title: Governor’s Executive Order 1995-5 (8/23/95) - Money-Back Guarantee Permit Review Program
for the Department of Environmental Protection

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 82
Description: This Executive Order recognizes that delays in making permitting decisions often have
significant impacts on the individual, government and business planning process and do not enhance the
ability of PADEP to protect the Commonwealth’s natural resources and, therefore, (1) establishes
processing times for certain PADEP permits, and (2) provides for refunds of permit processing fees if
PADEP fails to meet published processing times.
Title: NPDES Memorandum of Agreement between Commonwealth of PA and USEPA
Description: See previous write-up.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
B.2. Cross-Reference Table
Laws/Regulations/
Guidances
1. Effluent
Limitations/
Compliance
Schedule
2. Areawide
Treatment & Basin
Management Plans
3. TMDLs & WQ-
Based Effluent
Limits
4. Updating and
Managing WQ
Management Plans
5. Authority for
Intergovernmental
Cooperation
6. Implementing
New/Revised WQ
STATUTES
Administrative Code
of 1929
X
Conservation &
Natural Resources
Act of 1995
X
PA Clean Streams
Law
XX
X
X
X
PA Sewage
Facilities Act
XX
XX
Surface Mining
Conservation &
Reclamation Act
XX
X
Coal Refuse
Disposal Act
X
PA Solid Waste
Management Act
Noncoal Surface
Mining
Conservation &
Reclamation Act
X
Oil & Gas Act
X
X
PA Infrastructure
Investment
Authority Act
XX
Conservation
District Law
X
PA Fish & Boat
Code
X
Nutrient
Management Act
X
XX
Dam Safety and
Encroachments Act
X

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
Laws/Regulations/
Guidances
1. Effluent
Limitations/
Compliance
Schedule
2. Areawide
Treatment & Basin
Management Plans
3. TMDLs & WQ-
Based Effluent
Limits
4. Updating and
Managing WQ
Management Plans
5. Authority for
Intergovernmental
Cooperation
6. Implementing
New/Revised WQ
Transportation and
Vehicle Code
Amend Act 3 of
1997, Section 9106
Dirt and Gravel
Road Maintenance
XX
Local Health
Administration Law
X
Phosphate Detergent
Act
REGULATIONS
25 PA Code Chapter
71
X
XX
25 PA Code Chapter
77
XX
25 PA Code Chapter
78
X
25 PA Code Chapter
83
X
XX
25 PA Code Chapter
86
XX
25 PA Code Chapter
87
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
88
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
89
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
90
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
91
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
92
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
93
XX
X
X
X

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
Laws/Regulations/
Guidances
1. Effluent
Limitations/
Compliance
Schedule
2. Areawide
Treatment & Basin
Management Plans
3. TMDLs & WQ-
Based Effluent
Limits
4. Updating and
Managing WQ
Management Plans
5. Authority for
Intergovernmental
Cooperation
6. Implementing
New/Revised WQ
25 PA Code Chapter
94
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
95
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
97
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
101
XX
X
25 PA Code Chapter
102
XX
25 PA Code Chapter
103
X
25 PA Code Chapter
105
XX
25 PA Code Chapter
287
25 PA Code Chapter
288
25 PA Code Chapter
289
25 PA Code Chapter
291
25 PA Code Chapter
297
25 PA Code Chapter
299
25 PA Code Chapter
961
XX
25 PA Code Chapter
963
XX
25 PA Code Chapter
965
X
28 PA Code Chapter
15
X

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
Laws/Regulations/
Guidances
1. Effluent
Limitations/
Compliance
Schedule
2. Areawide
Treatment & Basin
Management Plans
3. TMDLs & WQ-
Based Effluent
Limits
4. Updating and
Managing WQ
Management Plans
5. Authority for
Intergovernmental
Cooperation
6. Implementing
New/Revised WQ
GUIDANCE
DOCUMENTS
28 PA Code Chapter
17
X
58 PA Code Chapter
51
X
58 PA Code Chapter
57
X
012-0100-001
012-0700-002
X
X
012-0800-001
X
012-1920-001
X
X
X
X
013-2000-001
258-2000-764
258-2000-765
258-2100-769
361-0100-002
X
X
X
361-0100-003
X
X
362-0300-001
X
X
362-0300-002
X
X
362-0300-003
X
362-0300-004
X
X
362-0300-005
X
X
362-0300-006
X
X
362-0400-001
X
X
362-0600-001
X
X
X
362-0600-002
X
X
X
362-2000-001
X
X
362-2183-003
X
362-2183-004
X
X
362-2206-001
X
362-2206-007
X
362-2208-002
X

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
Laws/Regulations/
Guidances
1. Effluent
Limitations/
Compliance
Schedule
2. Areawide
Treatment & Basin
Management Plans
3. TMDLs & WQ-
Based Effluent
Limits
4. Updating and
Managing WQ
Management Plans
5. Authority for
Intergovernmental
Cooperation
6. Implementing
New/Revised WQ
362-5512-002
X
X
363-0200-001
X
X
363-2134-008
X
X
381-5511-012
X
381-5511-013
X
381-5511-113
383-2125-108
391-2000-002
X
X
391-2000-003
X
X
391-2000-006
X
X
391-2000-007
X
X
391-2000-010
X
X
391-2000-011
X
X
391-2000-012
X
X
391-2000-013
X
X
391-2000-014
X
X
391-2000-015
X
X
391-2000-017
X
X
391-2000-018
X
X
391-2000-019
X
X
391-2000-020
X
X
391-3200-002
X
X
391-3200-003
X
X
391-3200-004
X
X
391-3200-005
X
X
391-3200-006
X
X
391-3200-007
X
X
391-3200-008
X
X
391-3200-010
X
X
391-3200-013
X
X
X
394-0300-001
X
X
X
X
394-2000-02
X
X
550-0300-001
X
X
550-2100-002
X

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
Laws/Regulations/
Guidances
1. Effluent
Limitations/
Compliance
Schedule
2. Areawide
Treatment & Basin
Management Plans
3. TMDLs & WQ-
Based Effluent
Limits
4. Updating and
Managing WQ
Management Plans
5. Authority for
Intergovernmental
Cooperation
6. Implementing
New/Revised WQ
560-0600-101
X
560-0600-102
X
560-0600-104
X
560-0600-105
X
560-0600-204
X
560-0700-302
X
560-0700-304
X
X
OTHER
DOCUMENTS
Constitution of the
Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania
XX
X
X
X
Water Quality
Toxics Management
Strategy – Statement
of Policy (25 PA
Code Chapter 16)
XX
Process for Low
Flow TMDLs
XX
Sect. 303(d) Lists of
Waters
X
Executive Order
1999-1 (1/7/99)
Land Use Planning
XX
Executive Order
1997-6 (10/14/97)
Agricultural Land
Preservation Policy
XX
Executive Order
1995-5 (8/23/95)
Money-back
Guarantee Permit
Review Program

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
Laws/Regulations/
Guidances
1. Effluent
Limitations/
Compliance
Schedule
2. Areawide
Treatment & Basin
Management Plans
3. TMDLs & WQ-
Based Effluent
Limits
4. Updating and
Managing WQ
Management Plans
5. Authority for
Intergovernmental
Cooperation
6. Implementing
New/Revised WQ
National Pollutant
Discharge
Elimination System
Memorandum of
Agreement Between
the Commonwealth
of Pennsylvania and
The US, Region III
-6/91
XX
X
Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania and
USEPA Operating
Agreement for
Clean Water State
Revolving Fund and
Drinking Water
State Revolving
Fund
X
Conditional
Approval of PA’s
Program to
Administer the
Surface Mining
Control &
Reclamation Act
X
Memorandum of
Agreement Between
the Federal Office of
Surface Mining and
PA Dept. of
Environmental
Protection regarding
the Surface Mining
Control &
Reclamation Act,
X

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page
Laws/Regulations/
Guidances
1. Effluent
Limitations/
Compliance
Schedule
2. Areawide
Treatment & Basin
Management Plans
3. TMDLs & WQ-
Based Effluent
Limits
4. Updating and
Managing WQ
Management Plans
5. Authority for
Intergovernmental
Cooperation
6. Implementing
New/Revised WQ
P.L. 95-87
Comprehensive Plan
for Abandoned Mine
Reclamation
X
Strategy for
Controlling Water
Quality Impacts of
CAFOs
X
Strategy for
Assessing PA’s
Unassessed Surface
Waters
XX
1998 Water Quality
Assessment 305(b)
Report
X
PA State
Programmatic
General Permit
(PASPGP-1)
X

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 91
3. List of EPA Approved Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)
For more detailed information about TMDLs, visit DEPs’ electronic website at http://dep.state.pa.us (choose
Subjects/Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs).
List of Approved 1998 TMDLs
Brush Creek in Butler County, DEP Stream Code 34787 was chosen as not meeting or not expected to meet
water quality standards for biochemical oxygen demand and dissolved oxygen even though all the pollution
controls required by law are already in place. The listed stream segment is from river mile 11.2 to 5.7.
Bald Eagle Creek in Blair County, DEP Stream Code 15835, was chosen as not meeting or not expected to
meet water quality standards for temperature. The listed stream segment is Bald Eagle Creek, showing 0.928
miles degraded.
Trout Creek in Montgomery County, DEP Stream Code 00980, was chosen as not meeting or not expected
to meet water quality standards for NH3-N and TRC, even though all the pollution controls required by law
are already in place. The listed stream segment extends from the Upper Merion Municipal Authority’s
sewage treatment plant outfall to its confluence with the Schuylkill River, a distance of approximately 0.13
mile.
Mill Creek in Lancaster County, DEP Stream Code 07612, was chosen as not meeting or not expected to
meet water quality standards for osmotic pressure even though all the pollution controls required by law are
already in place. The listed stream segment is from river mile 1.2 to 0.3 mile.
Conewago Creek in Dauphin County, DEP Stream Code 09243, was chosen as not meeting or not expected
to meet water quality standards for dissolved oxygen, even though all the pollution controls required by law
are already in place. The listed stream segment is Conewago Creek, showing 0.6 miles degraded.
Pennypack Creek in Montgomery County, DEP Stream Code 02409, was chosen as not meeting or not
expected to meet water quality standards for TCE, bacteria, and dissolved oxygen-consuming pollutants even
though all the pollution controls required by law are already in place. The listed stream segments include:
approximately 1.1 miles of stream beginning at the unnamed tributary near Moreland Avenue in Hatboro
Boro (for TCE); and from River Mile 19.9 to River Mile 3.4 (for dissolved oxygen and fecal coliform).

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 92
List of Approved 1999 TMDLs
Swatara Creek was listed on the CWA Section 303(d) List for not meeting or expecting to meet water
quality standards for metals, even though all of the pollution controls required by law are already in place.
The EPA approved TMDLs to address the listed segments and miles degraded, which are shown in the
following table:
Stream Code
Stream Name
Miles Degraded
10083
Coal Run
1.44
10084
Gebhard Run
1.99
10079
Goodspring Creek
6.59
10075
Lorberry Creek
1.74
10074
Lower Rausch Creek
3.93
10078
Middle Creek
5.32
10086
Panther Creek
1.73
10080
Poplar Creek
1.38
10076
Stumps Run
0.62
09361
Swatara Creek
10.04
Lake Luxembourg in Bucks County was chosen as not meeting or not expected to meet water quality
objectives due to excess nutrient and sediment loadings.
The following stream segments were chosen as not meeting or not expected to meet water quality criteria for
PCB and/or Chlordane. The overall goal of the TMDL is to achieve fishable/swimmable goal of the federal
Clean Water Act.
PCB/Chlordane
Brandywine Creek, Chester County, Stream Code
00004
US Rt.1 at Chadds Ford River mile 14.9 to PA/DE border.
River mile 10.45, Chlordane.
Susquehanna River (4 segments), Columbia,
Montour, Northumberland, Wyoming,
Lackawanna, Luzerne, Stream Code 06685
PA Rt. 92 at Falls River mile 208.8 to confluence with
West Branch River mile 125.5, PCB
Allegheny River, Allegheny County, Stream Code
42122
Lock and Dam 3 River mile 14.5 to mouth. River mile 0.0.
PCB and Chlordane
Monongahela River, Greene County, Stream
Code 37185
Point Marion Lock & Dam River Mile 90.8 to Grays
Landing Lock &Dam, River Mile 82.0, PCB and Chlordane
Cheat River, Fayette County, Stream Code 41885 Cheat Lake Dam River Mile 3.6 to mouth, River Mile 0.0,
Chlordane

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 93
Section IV
Comment/Response on September 25 Request in PA Bulletin for Public Comments on Pennsylvania’s
Continuing Planning Process for Water Quality Management
Department of Environmental Protection
10/25/99
A.
General Comments:
Comment:
In September 1999, PA's Quality Management Plan (QMP) was approved by EPA. This plan
reflects the overall QA Program framework and management system necessary to assure that data
generated by or for the Department are of acceptable quality to meet the needs of users and
decision-makers. It should be included in the CPP as there was no mention of this document.
Response:
Pa’s QMP has been included in: Section I.B.1.a; Section II. Element 4; Section III. B.1., B.2.
Comment:
Discussion of the Great Lakes Initiative (GLI) and PADEPs implementation of the program
should be included in the appropriate sections of the CPP. There is no mention of the GLI in the document.
Response:
The GLI has been included in Element 6 and will be included in Section III after it is approved
by EPA.
Comment:
A more detailed discussion of the Chesapeake Bay Program and its role in Pennsylvania’s
water quality management program should be included in the CPP.
Response:
Additional information on the Chesapeake Bay has been added to Section II. Element 4.
Comment:
Expansion on the discussion on the CWA section 401/404 programs should be provided.
Response:
More information on the CWA Section 401/404 has been added to Section II. Element 5.
EPA Comments

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 94
SECTION I
C. ‘Program Funding’
Comment:
EPA recommends this section provide more information. The types of information we would
like to see included is whether a grant is state or federally derived, whether it is annual and recurring, or
periodic and competitive and whether there are state match requirements. This section should also discuss
the process of grant application and review. Inclusion of the state WRAP grant and Environmental
Education Grants would be appropriate.
Response:
The WRAP grant and the Environmental Education grant information have been included in
Section I.C.1. j&k respectively. Section I.C. also includes the information requested on whether a grant is
state or federally derived, whether it is annual or recurring, or periodic and competitive and whether there
is a state match requirement. For more information on the individual grant application process and review
please refer to the DEP web site: www.dep.state.pa.us.
Comment:
-- Page 12, 1.e. Section 104(b)(3) and page 13, 2.a. Section 104(b)(3)
"Watershed Approach Grants" is not an accurate description of the grant program. This title could be
misleading as this program is not for funding Watershed grants only. A correct title would be "NPDES
Related State Program Grant."
Response:
These changes have been made.
E.
‘Public Participation Process’
Comment:
In general, this section does not provide enough detail for an overview of the state’s process
to allow a reader to determine where the requirements are laid out and and how they can become involved.
The public participation discussion should include the identification and discussion of Pennsylvania’s public
participation requirements set forth in applicable statutes and regulations. The Administrative Procedures
Act (APA) and the Pennsylvania Bulletin should be discussed as essential elements of the state’s process.
This section should also describe the organization within PADEP who oversees the public participation
process.
Response:
More information has been added to Section I.E. to address these suggestions.
SECTION II
Element 1
Comment:
-- Page 18, First Paragraph
"The development and specification of effluent limitations in NPDES permits must be done in a manner
consistent with the provisions of Chapters ." Chapter 16 should be added.
Response:
Section 93.8a includes a reference to Chapter 16.
Comment:
-- Page 18, end of first paragraph
"NPDES standards must also conform to applicable regulatory standards of ..." The Great Lakes Commission
should be added.
Response:
The Great Lakes Commission does not have water quality standards rulemaking authority.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 95
Comment:
-- Page 19 #3 ‘Existing Permitted Dischargers’
Paragraph a. states that technology based limits are effective at the time of permit issuance. An explanation and
clarification should be provided where PADEP allows a permit to have less stringent interim limits and a
compliance schedule to meet final limits for technology based requirements.
Response:
Clarification has been added.
Comment:
Paragraph c. states that new WQBELs and carry over parameters with more stringent WQBELs are
effective upon permit issuance. Clarification of Pennsylvania’s practice of allowing interim limits and a com
Response:
Clarification has been added.
Element 3
Comment:
This section gives a good overall explanation of section 303(d) listings and Total Maximum Daily
Loads (TMDLs). However, the process Pennsylvania uses to list waters for the purposes of 303(d) and the
process used to develop TMDLs needs to be described. We realize this process may change with the demands of
the program but the narrative should include an overall description of PADEP process from data collection
through TMDL development. It should therefore include a description of how data is collected by the biological
assessment under the unassessed waters program, and how it is evaluated to determine impairment for 303(d)
listing purposes, how waters are prioritized for TMDL development, sources of funding, use of GIS, the roles of
the regional offices and mining office, and the types of models that have been used for TMDL development. If
possible inclusion of a description of the ‘reference stream approach’ and the types of models under
consideration for future TMDL development should be included under Element 3. 40 CFR 130.7(a) provides a
list of items that should be addressed under this section.
Response:
This information has been added.
Element 4
Comment:
A discussion on how Total Maximum Daily Loads are incorporated into Water Quality Management
Plans should be included in this section.
Response:
This information has been added.
Element 5
Comment:
This section does a good job of describing the responsibilities of relevant government agencies.
However, it does not describe a method to insure and conduct intergovernmental review and cooperation. The
last paragraph mentions ‘many other agency agreements and the memorandums of understanding (MOU)’ that
are identified and briefly described in Section III. It would be helpful to define under Element 5 what an MOU
is, and describe the general nature of such an agreement and the reasoning for its establishment. The section
should also include more information on the role of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Corps of Army
Engineers.
Response:
Information on the Environmental Review Committee (ERC) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has
been added to Section II Element 5. The role of the Corps of Engineers is explained in Pennsylvania State
Program General Permit (PASPGP). The PASPGP and the ERC are used to insure and conduct
intergovernmental review and cooperation among DEP, ACOE and USFWS. Information on the DEP-EPA
Memorandum of Agreement has also been added.

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 96
Element 6
Comment:
A discussion of the petition process (and results) to the Department to have a water quality standard
changed would be appropriate in this section.
Response:
This information has been added to Element 6.
Comment:
Include a description the role of Chapter 16 and its periodic updates.
Response:
This information has been added to Element 6.
Element 7
No Comments
Element 8
No Comments
Element 9
Comment:
This discussion should be expanded to include a description of other factors that effect permit
issuance and priorities in Pennsylvania. This section only mentions the state’s money-back guarantee. It
discusses that there are no application backlogs, but does not mention whether this includes minor permits as
well. This description should be expanded to discuss minor permits. There are also expired permits in
Pennsylvania. A discussion on how expired permits are addressed and the prioritization in doing so should be
included. An explanation of the regulations where the requirements can be found regarding receipt and
processing of NPDES applications should be included.
Response:
This information has been added.
SECTION III
No Comments

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 97
B.
Comment:
It would be helpful if the table of contents could provide more detail in order to help guide the
reader.
Response:
More detailed information has been added to the table of contents.
Comment:
Section IB1 of the document fails to describe the EQB and has no statement of the role it
plays and the authority it has in the water management process. Nor is there a description in Section IB of
the role EPA or other federal agencies play in the water quality management process. We feel that this
information should be added to the document. Section IB describes the general duties of numerous state
departments and other commissions but provides no analysis of how they will all interact in the water
quality management process.
Response:
A description of the EQB has been added at I.B.1.b. The roles of the federal agencies are
defined by the federal government. However the interactive roles of the federal agencies has been
explained in more detail in Section II. Element 5. DEP uses watersheds as the fundamental unit of
environmental management and protection in the Commonwealth and supports local stewardship as the
primary means of achieving comprehensive watershed management. For more information refer to
Pennsylvania’s NPS Management Program 1999 Update approved by EPA in October 1999. (This CPP
references the NPS Management Program 1999 Update in: Section I.B.1.a., I.C.1.g., I.D.2.a.&b.; Section
II. Element 5; Section III.B.1.2.). The elements in Section II also provide information on how the various
departments and commissions listed in Section I.B. interact with specific roles in the water quality
management process.
Comment:
Under Section I.B.4. we were pleased that PA's CPP acknowledges the importance of
volunteer monitoring and recognizes that volunteers can help support PADEP efforts. But we feel this
section needs to more clearly lay out the role citizen data plays in State environmental efforts, how is the
data actually being used? For example, volunteer data and observations can and should be used to help
focus PADEP's limited resources, particularly in the arena of prioritizing waterways to be investigated
under the State's unassessed waters program. It is important that the CPP lay out in detail the use of
volunteer data. In addition, while the section regarding volunteer data talks about the Pennsylvania Senior
Environment Corps, it fails to talk about the interaction between the State and other citizen monitoring
programs. For example, the Delaware Riverkeeper Network has been monitoring water quality along the
Delaware River and tributary streams since 1990, we have protocols and a quality assurance/quality control
program that were reviewed and critiqued by all four watershed states and the DRBC, and we have shared
our data consistently with PA as well as other local, state and federal agencies. While Riverkeeper does
not expect PA to walk into a courtroom in reliance upon volunteer data, we do believe this data can be
used to help focus energies in the unassessed waters program, to identify waterways in need of additional
TMDL or anti-deg review, to help identify waterways in need of review for potential enforcement activities
and/or additional regulatory attention, to identify illegal pollution discharges, etc… .
We would like to see this kind of analysis laid out in the text of the CPP. We would also like to see plans
for interacting with other volunteer monitoring programs, while the State is investing time and financial
resources in the Senior volunteer corps there are many programs like Riverkeeper's which need to be
included in State efforts.
Response:
This information has been added to Section I.B.4 and Section II.C. Element 3.
Delaware Riverkeeper Comments

394-0810-001 / December 6, 1999 / Page 98
Comment:
I found the discussion regarding the Comprehensive Water Quality management Planning
program interesting and would like to request a copy of the plans created for the Delaware Watershed
regions?
Regarding Section II Element 3, discussing implementation of nonpoint source load allocations, while the
proposed CPP references a "combination of federal, state and local programs, which include regulatory,
nonregulatory and voluntary efforts" it is not clear how the State proposes to address nonpoint source
pollution loads. It is important to provide more specific planning and detail in this portion of the CPP. As
we all know nonpoint source pollution is the most serious source of pollution for the State's waterways and
therefore it is critical that the CPP lay out clear plans and planning for addressing this massive pollution
source. Because addressing nonpoint source pollution requires integrated and coordinated action under a
number of state and federal environmental laws, we believe it is critical that the CPP is used as the
mechanism to coordinate the control of nonpoint source pollution and recommend edits which would
accomplish this goal.
Response:
Section II. Elements 3 & 4 have been expanded to include this information.
Comment:
DEP's Strategy for Assessing Pennsylvania's Unassessed Surface Waters includes detailed
discussion and plans for assessing the State's unassessed waters. Will this document be included as part of
the CPP? If that was not the intention, we would like to recommend that it become a part of the CPP.
Response:
DEP’s Strategy for Assessing Pennsylvania’s Unassessed Surface Waters is listed in Section
III.B.1. and is now included in Section II.C. Element 3.
Comment:
The CPP does not appear to include plans for updating and revising the CPP in future years.
We would like to recommend that this procedure be included as required by regulations.
Response:
As Pennsylvania’s Water Quality Management rules and regulations change the new documents
will be added to keep the CPP current.

Department of Environmental Protection
Bureau of Watershed Conservation
P.O. Box 8555
Harrisburg, PA 17105-8555
An Equal Opportunity Employer
3900-TG-3940810001
December 1999
This fact sheet and related environmental information are available electronically via Internet. For more information,
visit us through the Pennsylvania homepage at http://www.state.pa.us or visit DEP directly at http://www.dep.state.pa.us
(choose directLINK “Continuing Planning Process”).
www.GreenWorksChannel.org - A web space dedicated to helping you learn how to protect and
improve the environment. The site features the largest collection of environmental videos available
on the Internet and is produced by the nonprofit Environmental Fund for Pennsylvania, with
financial support from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, 800 334-3190
.

Back to top