1. DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
      2. Office of Oil and Gas Management
      3. BACKGROUND:
      4. PROCEDURES
      5. A. Addressing Water Supply Pollution or Diminution.
      6. B. Providing Water to Users of an Impacted Water Supply.
      7. C. Short Term Water Supply Impacts.
      8. selection.
      9. F. Permanent Water Replacement/Restoration Planning.
      10. supply regulated by the Department’s Safe Drinking Water Program as remedy:
      11. G. Laboratory Analysis.
  1. Appendix A
  2. Oil and Gas Districts
  3. Appendix B
      1. VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (VOCs):
      2. SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS (SOCs):
      3. INORGANIC CHEMICALS (IOCs):
      4. RADIONUCLIDES:
      5. MICROBIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS:
      6. SECONDARY CONTAMINANTS AND OTHERS:
      7. MICROSCOPIC PARTICULATEANALYSIS (MPA)
      8. OTHER CONTAMINANTS:

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page i
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Office of Oil and Gas Management
DOCUMENT NUMBER:
800-0810-002
TITLE:
Policy for the Replacement or Restoration of Private Water Supplies
Impacted by Unconventional Operations
EFFECTIVE DATE:
October 8, 2016
AUTHORITY:
The 2012 Oil and Gas Act (58 Pa.C.S. §§ 3201–3274); The Clean Streams
Law (35 P.S. §§ 691.1,
et seq.
); The Land Recycling and Environmental
Remediation Standards Act (35 P.S. §§ 6026.101,
et seq.
);
Sections 1905-A, 1917-A and 1920-A of The Administrative Code of
1929 (71 P.S. §§ 510-5, 510-17 and 510-20); and 25 Pa. Code Chapter 78a
(relating to unconventional wells).
POLICY:
The Department of Environmental Protection (Department or DEP) will
follow the guidance presented in this document to implement the
requirements relating to the restoration or replacement of private water
supplies adversely impacted by unconventional operations with a water
supply of adequate quantity and/or quality for the purposes served by
impacted water supply source(s).
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this guidance is to inform Department staff, the regulated
industry and the public how to comply with the water supply restoration
and replacement requirements in the 2012 Oil and Gas Act, The Clean
Streams Law, and 25 Pa. Code Chapter 78a.
APPLICABILITY:
This document is the Department’s guidance for ensuring compliance with
legal requirements related to restoration and replacement of private water
supplies adversely impacted by unconventional operations.
DISCLAIMER:
The policies and procedures outlined in this guidance document are
intended to supplement existing requirements. Nothing in the policies or
procedures will affect regulatory requirements.
The policies and procedures herein are not an adjudication or a regulation.
There is no intent on the part of the Department to give these rules that
weight or deference. This document establishes the framework, within
which DEP will exercise its administrative discretion in the future. DEP
reserves the discretion to deviate from this policy statement if
circumstances warrant.
PAGE LENGTH:
17 Pages

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 1
BACKGROUND:
Section 3218(a) of the 2012 Oil and Gas Act requires a well operator that adversely affects a public or
private water supply by pollution or diminution to restore or replace the impacted supply with an
alternate water source adequate in quantity and quality for the purpose served by the supply.
Section 3218(a) provide that the quality of a restored or replaced water supply must meet the standards
established under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act (35 P.S. §§ 721.1–721.17) or is comparable
to the quality of the water that existed prior to pollution if the water quality was better than these
standards.
See
58 Pa.C.S. § 3218(a);
see also
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(2).
If a water supply user/owner, or an operator, contacts the Department with a complaint that a water
supply may have been adversely impacted by oil and gas operations; the Department will conduct an
investigation to determine whether the water supply has been affected by oil and gas operations.
See
58 Pa.C.S. § 3218(b). If oil and gas operations are determined or presumed to have adversely impacted
a water supply, the Department will take appropriate measures to require the responsible operator to
restore or replace the supply.
See
58 Pa.C.S. § 3218(b).
If the water supply user/owner or operator indicates or complains that human health is being affected as
a result of oil and gas operations, the Department will provide the individuals with contact information
for the Department of Health. If oil and gas operations are determined or presumed to have adversely
impacted a water supply, the Department will also inform the Department of Health of this
determination.
If a causal connection between oil and gas operations and the water supply impact cannot be established
and the “rebuttable presumption” (see below) does not apply, the complainant will be notified that oil
and gas operations did not impact the water supply or that there was insufficient evidence to determine
that oil and gas operations caused the impacts to the water supply.
Section 3218(c) of the 2012 Oil and Gas Act creates a rebuttable presumption of liability on a well
operator for the pollution of a water supply if the supply is located within a “rebuttable presumption
area” and the pollution occurs within a defined period of time.
See
58 Pa.C.S. § 3218(c). For an
unconventional gas well, a water supply is within the rebuttable presumption area if the water supply is
within 2,500 feet of the vertical well bore and the pollution occurred within 12 months of the later of
drilling, stimulation, well alteration or completion activities.
See
58 Pa.C.S. § 3218(c)(ii).
Section 3218(d) of the 2012 Oil and Gas Act provides the well operator an opportunity to rebut the
presumption of liability. There are five statutory defenses to the presumption of liability which are
listed below. Any one of these defenses is sufficient to rebut the presumption for unconventional wells.
1.
The pollution existed prior to the drilling or alteration activity as determined by a pre-drilling or
pre-alteration survey.
2.
The landowner refused to allow the operator access to conduct a pre-drilling or pre-alteration
survey. The operator should submit evidence to the Department demonstrating that the
landowner was notified by certified mail or personal service that the refusal of access to conduct
a pre-drill or pre-alteration survey could be used to rebut a presumption of liability.
3.
The water supply is not within 2,500 feet of an unconventional well.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 2
4.
For unconventional wells, the pollution occurred more than 12 months after the later of
completion, drilling, stimulation or alteration activities for unconventional wells.
5.
The pollution occurred as a result of a cause other than drilling or alteration activity. Given the
technical nature of this defense, a report documenting the cause should be prepared, signed and
sealed by a geologist licensed in this Commonwealth or accompanied by an explanation of why a
geologic analysis was unnecessary based on the facts.
The owner of the water supply may notify the Department if the owner of the water supply prefers not to
be supplied temporary water or if the owner of the water supply prefers not to have the water supply
restored or replaced. Any such notice should be provided to the Department in writing.
PROCEDURES
A.
Addressing Water Supply Pollution or Diminution.
Generally, water supply related issues come to the attention of the Department in one of three
ways: 1) a complaint by the water supply user, 2) notification by the operator, or 3) discovery of
the problem by the Department while conducting an investigation in the area of the water supply.
All water supply concerns related to oil and gas operations should be referred to the appropriate
Oil and Gas District Office; the contact information for those offices is provided in Appendix A.
Oil and gas related complaints may also be directed to the state wide toll free number at
1-866-255-5158.
The procedure for how the Department conducts all water supply investigation requests related
to oil and gas operations can be found in the Department’s document titled, “Standards and
Guidelines for Identifying, Tracking, and Resolving Oil and Gas Violations” (Document number
820-4000-001).
Once the Department makes a positive determination that an unconventional well operator is
responsible for adverse impacts to a water supply, the Oil and Gas District Offices should use the
procedures outlined in this document as guidance to ensure adequate and timely replacement or
restoration of an affected water supply. Oil and Gas District Offices should follow this guidance
unless the circumstances of a specific case warrant a different approach to resolving the case,
within the requirements of the law.
B.
Providing Water to Users of an Impacted Water Supply.
If the Department observes an indicator for a potential impact of quality or quantity (e.g.,
effervescence, turbidity, odor, sheen, water loss) to a water supply in which the rebuttable
presumption applies, the Department will request that the operator takes measures to ensure
delivery of water to the user within 24 hours and to provide the Department all information
known to the operator that may support any of the statutory defenses to the rebuttable
presumption of liability as soon as practicable.
The Department will notify the water supply user/owner that the rebuttable presumption applies
to their specific case and provide a fact sheet explaining rebuttable presumption and their rights
under the 2012 Oil and Gas Act.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 3
The Department may rescind its request to an operator to ensure delivery of water to the water
supply user within 24 hours, if the operator provides a valid statutory defense to the rebuttable
presumption of liability to the Department in the interim.
If the Department makes a determination that unconventional operations have adversely
impacted a water supply, in which rebuttable presumption does not apply, the Department will
request that the responsible operator takes measures to ensure delivery of water to the user within
24 hours of being notified of its findings. The Department will also notify the water supply
user/owner of the determination in writing.
1.
Water for Immediate Needs:
Upon notice by the Department for the need to provide water to the user, operators should
take immediate measures, within 24 hours, to address the water consumption needs of
those affected by the impacted water supply. The immediate response of providing
potable water for human consumption should be at least one gallon per person per day or
five gallons per household per day, whichever is greater. Additional quantities of water
may be necessary to address immediate needs depending on the use of the water supply
(e.g., animals are dependent on the impacted water supply, including pets and livestock).
If the operator fails to ensure delivery of potable water to address immediate water needs
of the impacted party within 24 hours of the Department’s notification, the Program
Manager will issue an administrative order directing the operator to provide potable water
immediately.
2.
Temporary Water Supply:
If the Department determines that the operator is responsible for the impact to the water
supply, a temporary water supply of adequate quantity and quality for the purposes
served by the impacted water supply must be established within 72 hours of the
Department’s notice. Temporary water replacement is only acceptable for a period
approved by the Department, in writing, and does not relieve the operator of the
obligation to restore or replace the water supply.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(f).
Temporary water must be adequate in quantity and quality for the purposes served by the
impacted water supply. For sources used for human consumption and sanitary purposes,
the temporary water meets this requirement when it is from a potable water supply that
conforms to and is transported in a manner that meets the requirements in the
Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act (35 P.S. §§ 721.1-721.17) and 25 Pa. Code
Chapter 109 (relating to safe drinking water). Also, temporary water storage tanks and its
associated plumbing accessories must be certified for conformance with ANSI/NSF
Standard 61.
The temporary water supply for domestic use is adequate in quantity and quality if it is at
least 75 gallons per person, per day, of potable water, is plumbed into the existing water
supply system, unless specific needs require higher amounts (e.g., pets, plants and other
domestic needs).

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 4
Temporary water supplies used in lieu of water supplies for agricultural, commercial,
industrial or other legitimate beneficial uses is adequate in quantity and quality if it meets
an acceptable standard in a necessary quantity, as determined by the Department, to allow
the continuance of the uses that were dependent on the impacted water supply.
Temporary water must continue to be supplied, uninterrupted, by the operator to the users
of the affected water supply until the Department determines, in writing, that the need for
a temporary water supply no longer exists.
C.
Short Term Water Supply Impacts.
The Department recognizes that some water quality issues with water supplies are temporal and
may remedy themselves with time. Examples include increased turbidity, induced gasses and
changes in color. An operator may submit a request to allow additional time to evaluate a water
supply to demonstrate that the impact may be temporary. In lieu of a restoration or replacement
plan, under these circumstances, an operator should submit a corrective action/monitoring
schedule outlining the what measures will be taken by the operator to demonstrate that the
quality and/or quantity of the water supply is improving and the issues may be temporary (e.g.,
water samples and other empirical measurements). This period should not exceed six months
without written Department approval. After six months, the operator should provide the
Department with evidence showing that the water supply has returned to its pre-impact condition
or submit a plan for the permanent restoration or replacement of the water supply. The
Department reserves the right to issue an administrative order directing the operator to provide a
permanent water supply restoration or replacement plan within specified timeframes.
D.
Permanent Restoration or Replacement of a Private Water Supply Requirements.
If the Department determines that a private water supply must be restored or replaced due to
pollution or diminution, within 30 days following a final positive determination, the Department
should issue, as appropriate, a Notice of Violation or a Request for Corrective Action requesting,
among other things, a permanent water supply restoration or replacement plan (PWS Plan) with
specified timeframes for milestones.
See
“Standards and Guidelines for Identifying, Tracking,
and Resolving Oil and Gas Violations” (Document number 820-4000-001).
Permanent Water Supply Restoration or Replacement Plan (PWS PLAN).
The operator’s PWS Plan should propose, at a minimum, water treatment options, water supply
servicing/rehabilitation measures, newly constructed well in the same aquifer, new water source,
or connection to a public water system. Any combination of these options is also acceptable.
The PWS Plan should state what measures will be taken by the operator to permanently restore
or replace the impacted water supply and be prepared and signed by a qualified professional
(e.g., P.E., P.G.) with expertise on the subject matter in the proposal. The PWS Plan should
include the manufacture’s specifications instructions and literature for all equipment proposed to
be installed as part of the permanent water supply restoration or replacement plan. The PWS
Plan should also include any drawings, calculations photographs, maps, sample data and
narrative as requested by the Department to be part of the plan. The PWS Plan should also
include a proposed water sampling plan as needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the
proposed remedy.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 5
A restored or replaced water supply should meet the following:
a.
The quality of a restored or replaced water supply must meet the standards established
under the act of May 1, 1984 (P.L. 206, No. 43), known as the Pennsylvania Safe
Drinking Water Act, or is comparable to the quality of the water supply before it was
affected by the operator if that water supply exceeded those standards.
See
58 Pa.C.S.
§ 3216(a);
see also
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(2).
If deemed necessary by the water supply owner or the Department, additional treatment
of the public drinking water supply used to replace an impacted water supply may be
required to meet these conditions.
b.
Meet the quantity requirements for the purposes served by the impacted water supply and
deliver the amount of water necessary to satisfy the water user’s needs and the demands
of reasonably foreseeable uses.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(3). With respect to
agricultural water supplies, the term reasonably foreseeable uses includes the reasonable
expansion of use where the water supply available prior to drilling exceeded the actual
use.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(3)(iii). Quantity requirements may be met by using a
combination of water source(s) yield and storage to deliver the amount of water
necessary to satisfy the water user’s water demands when needed.
c.
Be as reliable as the previous water supply.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(1)(i).
d.
Be as permanent as the previous water supply.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(1)(ii).
e.
Not require excessive maintenance.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(1)(iii).
f.
Provide the water user with as much control and accessibility as exercised over the
previous water supply, once ownership/responsibility of the restored or replaced water
supply is conveyed to the owner.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(1)(iv). The connection to
a public water supply as a replacement water supply is considered as providing the owner
and the user adequate control and accessibility.
g.
Include provisions for all necessary plumbing, conveyance, pumping or auxiliary
equipment and facilities necessary for the water user to utilize the water supply.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(4).
h.
Not result in increased costs to operate and maintain. If the operating and maintenance
costs of the restored or replaced water supply are increased, the operator shall provide for
permanent payment of the increased operating and maintenance costs.
See
25 Pa. Code
§ 78a.51(d)(1)(v).
i.
When an impacted water supply is permanently replaced with a public water supply
regulated by the Department’s Safe Drinking Water Program and provisions for the
permanent payment of the increased operating and maintenance costs are made to the
affected parties, but the property owner does not wish to be provided with any additional
treatment measures to water from the public water supply, the Department will consider

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 6
the remedy as having met the Department’s requirement for the responsible operator to
permanently restore or replace the affected supply.
As provided in section 78a.51, if the well operator and the water user are unable to reach
agreement on the means for restoring or replacing the water supply, the Department or
either party may request a conference under Section 3251 of the 2012 Oil and Gas Act
(relating to conferences) to help facilitate the review and approval of the means for
permanently restoring or replacing the water supply.
E.
Factors to be considered in permanent water supply restoration or replacement response
selection.
The Department will consider a number of factors when evaluating the PWS plan. These
include, but are not limited to:
1.
Effectiveness – The ability of the remedial response to mitigate the threats posed by the
site specific contaminants. Restoration or replacement plans must provide responses that
meet Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act standards or better.
See
25 Pa. Code
§ 78a.51(d)(2).
2.
Time Frame of the Response – Providing a timely permanent water supply remediation to
affected parties is the goal of the Department.
3.
Reliability – Restored or replaced water supplies must be capable of consistently meeting
all required health-based and performance-based standards in addition to quantity
demands. If a restored or replaced water supply remediation response fails to meet both
water quality and quantity requirements, the Department will require the responsible
party to employ a more reliable solution.
4.
Implementation – The feasibility of restoring versus replacing the water supply should be
considered.
5.
Cost – The capital costs of proposed water supply remedies that are capable of meeting
the Department’s requirements should be considered. Long term operation and
maintenance costs will be considered in addition to the initial capital cost of replacing or
restoring a water supply.
F.
Permanent Water Replacement/Restoration Planning.
1.
Preliminary Consultation:
The operator, water supply user/owner, consultant(s), and the Department should discuss
what remedial action will be taken to restore or replace the impacted water supply. This
will provide all parties involved with a better understanding of the Department’s
expectations for restoring/replacing the impacted water supply.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 7
2.
Restoration of a Water Supply with Treatment System(s), Servicing, Rehabilitation:
If an operator is proposing to restore an impacted water supply with treatment system(s)
and/or servicing/rehabilitation measures, the information for the proposed treatment
system(s) and/or servicing/rehabilitation measures must be provided to the Department in
the PWS Plan at least 15 days prior to commencement of work.
New wells drilled in the same aquifer as an impacted water supply, which targets the
same water bearing zones, will be viewed as a restorative course of action and not as a
new water source for replacement purposes.
Restoration of a private water supply with treatment system(s) should meet the following:
a.
Restore the water quality of the parameter(s) impacted by oil and gas operations
quality and/or quantity as outlined below, with such restoration confirmed by
comparisons to post-drilling analytical sampling results and surveys taken by
qualified representatives of the Department, the operator, and/or the water supply
user/owner. All post-drilling analytical samples and documentation must be
performed in accordance with the affiliated Pennsylvania-accredited laboratory’s
approved sample collection, preservation and handling procedures and chain of
custody.
(i)
If prior to the impact of oil and gas operations, a water quality parameter
was better than primary or secondary Maximum Contaminate Levels
(MCL) standards established under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water
Act, the restored parameter should be comparable to the pre-impact
quality of the water.
(ii)
If prior to the impact of oil and gas operations, an impacted water quality
parameter was worse than the primary or secondary MCL standards
established under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act, the restored
parameter must meet or be better than the respective MCL established
under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act.
(iii)
If a water quality parameter with no primary or secondary drinking water
standard established under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act is
determined to be impacted by oil and gas operations, the concentration of
the parameter in the restored water supply should be comparable to the
pre-impact water quality.
(iv)
If the predrilling or prealteration concentration of a Pennsylvania Safe
Drinking Water Act water quality parameter impacted by oil and gas
operations is unknown, the restored parameter should meet or be better
than the respective primary or secondary MCL standard established under
the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act.
(v)
If a water quality parameter is impacted by oil and gas operations and that
parameter has no primary or secondary drinking water standard
established under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act and the pre-

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 8
impact concentration is unknown, the restored water supply should meet
an applicable health-based criteria used by the Safe Drinking Water
Program and/or the Statewide Health Standards for Groundwater used by
the Department’s Environmental Cleanup and Brownfields Program.
These programs will be consulted to determine an acceptable level for
restoration requirements.
(vi)
Restored water supplies to be used for agricultural, commercial, industrial
or other legitimate beneficial uses should meet an acceptable standard,
determined by the Department, to allow those uses that were dependent on
the impacted water supply to continue.
b.
The sample plan needs to demonstrate that the remedial actions for the water
quality parameter(s) determined to be impacted by oil and gas operations meet, at
a minimum, the drinking water MCL standards found in the Pennsylvania Safe
Drinking Water Act and any other MCL standards for water quality parameter(s)
or contaminant(s) of a concern required by the Department.
For restored water supplies utilizing only a treatment system or if multiple
treatment systems are employed serially, post treatment water samples should be
collected to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment system(s).
Any parameters deemed of a concern by the Department based on the
Department’s investigation and documentation submitted by the operator to the
Department regarding the constituents of concern from the well site that are
affecting the water supply or may be a concern as a result of the
restoration/rehabilitative measures should also be sampled and analyzed.
If insufficient information is provided to identify the constituents of concern, the
Department may request that the operator collect samples to analyze for
parameters, as determined by the Department, to identify the presence of
constituents of concern. The Department may then require that the operator
sample for those detected constituents or tentatively identified compounds to
specify standards, as set forth in paragraphs 2. a.(i-vi), above.
Additional rounds of sampling to confirm the adequacy of the restoration may be
required to continue following the initial phase of sampling results that meet the
requirements of the law and/or an order of the Department.
3.
Permanent Replacement of a Water Supply with a New Water Source:
If an operator is proposing to replace a water supply with a new water source,
information relating to the proposed alternative source of water must be submitted to the
Department in the PWS Plan 15 days prior to connecting the new water supply to the
affected property. Unregulated surface water sources or groundwater sources under the
direct influence of surface water should not be used to replace the existing private water
supply intended for human consumption unless a treatment system is installed to provide
continuous filtration and disinfection to ensure adequate treatment to reliably protect

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 9
users from the adverse health effects of microbiological contaminants, including
pathogenic bacteria, viruses and protozoan cysts.
Replacement of a private water supply with a new water source should meet the
following:
a.
Ensure the new water supply meets all primary and secondary MCL standards
established under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act.
See
Appendix A.
(i)
If prior to impact by oil and gas operations, a water quality parameter was
better than the primary or secondary MCL standards established under the
Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act, the water quality parameter in the
replacement water supply should be comparable to the pre-impact quality
of the water.
(ii)
If a water quality parameter with no primary or secondary drinking water
MCL standard established under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water
Act is determined to be impacted by oil and gas operations, the
concentration of the parameter in the replacement water supply should be
comparable to the pre-impact water quality.
(iii)
New water supplies to be used for agricultural, commercial, industrial or
other legitimate beneficial uses should meet an acceptable standard,
determined by the Department, to allow the continuance of the uses that
were dependent on the impacted water supply.
b.
Prevent any cross connection to the abandoned water supply.
c.
When polluted water well(s) are being abandoned, properly abandon the impacted
groundwater supply in accordance with Act 610, the Water Well Drillers License
Act. Guidance on water well abandonment procedures can be found in the
Department’s document titled, “Groundwater Monitoring Guidance Manual”
(Document number 383-3000-001).
d.
Sample plan:
Include a sample plan in the PWS plan to demonstrate that the new water source
meets all primary and secondary MCL standards established under the
Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act and any other MCL standards for water
quality parameter(s) or contaminant(s) of a concern required by the Department.
If a treatment system(s) is also required for the new water source, post-treatment
samples should be collected in lieu of raw water samples.
Additional rounds of sampling to confirm the adequacy of the new water source
may be required to continue following the initial round of sampling results that
meet the requirements of the law and/or an order of the Department.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 10
e.
Additional measures to be taken when proposing drilled water well(s) as remedy
for water replacement, whereas total withdrawal or withdrawal use from one or
more points of withdrawal within a watershed operated as a system either
concurrently or sequentially exceeds an average rate of 10,000 gallons a day in
a 30-day period.
For helpful information related to water well construction, refer to the
Hydrogeologic Report requirements in the “PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY
MANUAL” (Document number 383-2125-108); the “AQUIFER TESTING
GUIDANCE FOR PUBLIC WATER SYSTEMS” (Document Number
349-2125-001; and the well abandonment procedures of the “GROUNDWATER
MONITORING GUIDANCE” (Document number 383-3000-001).
(i)
Well Siting:
A professional geologist licensed in this Commonwealth should be
responsible for determining the siting of the proposed private water supply
well at an appropriate location and should make reasonable efforts to
obtain the highest quality groundwater sources available. It is important
that the hydrogeologic setting be considered during the well siting phase
of a project.
The location of the water well should be adequate to protect the
groundwater source from foreseeable sources of contamination, and
reasonable measures should be taken to prevent diminution of source
water quality. The well should be located so that it is protected against
flooding and surface water influence. If the landowner disagrees with the
location of the water well, the operator and/or landowner should request a
conference under Section 3251 of the 2012 Oil and Gas Act (relating to
conferences).
If groundwater withdrawal has potential to impact a special protection
water (High Quality or Exceptional Value) based on designated use
classification per 25 Pa. Code Chapter 93, the operator should work with
the Department in creating a plan that satisfies the guidelines outlined in
the Department’s guidance,
Water Quality Antidegradation
Implementation Guidance
, (Document number: 391-0300-002).
(ii)
Site Survey:
After the well is sited, locational data (latitude and longitude) should be
provided to the Department prior to drilling the water well. The
Department may choose to independently conduct its own site survey and
evaluate the well location to survey and document the physical
surroundings of the well and its proximity to any potential sources of
contamination prior to approving the PWS Plan.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 11
(iii)
Well Drilling Plan:
After the site survey is conducted, the professional geologist should
prepare and submit a well drilling plan to the appropriate Oil and Gas
District Office.
See
Appendix A. The plan should establish a preliminary
hydrogeologic understanding of the project site, a monitoring plan for
aquifer testing (quality and quantity) and the proposed well construction
design of the water well(s). Well drilling should not commence until the
well drilling plan is reviewed by a Department Professional Geologist.
For existing wells being proposed as a source of replacement water
supply, a plan should still be submitted to the Department establishing a
preliminary hydrogeologic understanding of the project site, a monitoring
plan for aquifer testing (quality and quantity) and any available
information on the existing water well(s), such as well driller logs and
field tests. The Department Professional Geologist will review the plan
within 30 days of its submission to the Department.
Water well(s) should be drilled by a registered well driller licensed by the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Department should be provided
with dates and times of all water well drilling and testing activities.
Erosion and sediment control measures must be followed for all earth
moving activities.
See
25 Pa. Code Chapter 102 and the Department’s
guidance document,
Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Manual
,
(Document number 363-2134-008) for further information.
(iv)
Drilling Plan Modifications:
After well drilling, the professional geologist should provide the
Department with any modifications to the drilling plan as an addendum to
the drilling plan.
(v)
Aquifer Testing:
When proposing drilled water well(s), with potential to exceed demands of
an average rate of 10,000 gallons a day in a 30-day period, the Department
may require a constant rate pump test to be conducted on the well(s) being
proposed as a new source in order to adequately define the hydraulic
characteristics of the aquifer and well(s). The duration of the pump test
will be based upon the required yield of the new source to meet the
quantity requirements for the purposes previously served by the replaced
water supply. The proposed duration of the pump test should be shared
with the Department prior to commencement of the pump test. The yield
must also deliver an amount of water necessary to satisfy the water user’s
needs and the demands of any reasonably foreseeable uses. Data from the
test are subject to appropriate analysis to demonstrate the suitability of the
well as a long-term water supply source including, when necessary, the
evaluation of significant potential impacts from the groundwater
withdrawal on other water resources. The results derived from properly

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 12
conducted and analyzed aquifer tests will also provide oil and gas
operators with the data necessary to support their claim that the water
supply has been properly replaced to meet the requirements outlined in the
2012 Oil and Gas Act (58 Pa.C.S. §§ 3201,
et seq.
) and 25 Pa. Code
§§ 78a.51-78a.52. All data and analysis derived from the aquafer test
should be submitted to the Department for review.
f.
Additional measures to be taken when proposing to connect to a public water
supply regulated by the Department’s Safe Drinking Water Program as remedy:
(i)
Approval from public water purveyor/water authority:
An operator should consult with the public water supply/water authority
on the feasibility of connecting new customers to their water supply.
Many factors should be considered by the public water supply including:
?
Available capacity to add additional consumers to public water
supply,
?
Federal, State, and Local approvals and permit requirements,
?
Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission requirements (if
applicable),
?
Logistics and property easements.
(ii)
Capital costs and long term cost:
In addition to the cost of connecting an affected property to a public water
supply, the operator shall provide for permanent payment of the increased
cost for the service provided by the public water supply, compared to the
historic operation and maintenance costs of the replaced water supply.
See
25 Pa. Code § 78a.51(d)(1)(v).
(iii)
Notification to the Department:
Both the Department’s Oil & Gas Management Program and Safe
Drinking Water Program should be notified of the intent to connect users
to a public water supply.
(iv)
Include a sample plan based sampling requirements will be contingent on
the public water system’s classification as follows:
?
Community Water Supply – Total Coliform, E. Coli and
Heterotrophic Plate Count samples should be collected at a sample
point after the connection to the public water system.
?
Non-transient Water Supply - Total Coliform, E. Coli and
Heterotrophic Plate Count samples should be collected at a sample
point after the connection to the public water system.
?
Transient Water Supply - All parameters required under the
Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act should be sampled at a
sample point after the connection to the public water system.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 13
If a treatment system is installed onto the distribution system being served
by the public water supply; post treatment samples should be collected.
Any water quality parameters deemed a concern by the Department for
which the treatment system is targeting; those parameters should also be
sampled for in addition to those required in this section for public water
supplies.
G.
Laboratory Analysis.
All analyses of samples should be performed by a laboratory that is certified by the DEP under
25 Pa. Code Chapter 252 (relating to environmental laboratory accreditation). The samples
should be submitted to the laboratory in laboratory-issued bottle ware, with appropriate chain-of-
custody documentation and within the required holding times.
Additionally, all volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) to be submitted to a laboratory for VOC
analysis should be collected by a person properly trained to collect such samples.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 14

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Appendix A

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Oil and Gas Districts

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 15

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Appendix B
The following tables list the sampling requirements for new water sources required to be sampled and
analyzed for all primary and secondary MCL standards established under the Pennsylvania Safe
Drinking Water Act. The Department may require monitoring of any other contaminant(s) as
determined necessary to adequately evaluate the quality of the replaced/restored water supply.
VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (VOCs):
BENZENE
CARBON TETRACHLORIDE
o-DICHLOROBENZENE
para-DICHLOROBENZENE
1,2-DICHLOROETHANE
1,1-DICHLOROETHYLENE
cis-1,2-DICHLOROETHYLENE
trans-1,2-DICHLOROETHYLENE
DICHLOROMETHANE
1,2-DICHLOROPROPANE
ETHYLBENZENE
MONOCHLOROBENZENE
STYRENE
TETRACHLOROETHYLENE
TOLUENE
1,2,4-TRICHLOROBENZENE
1,1,1-TRICHLOROETHANE
1,1,2-TRICHLOROETHANE
TRICHLOROETHYLENE
VINYL CHLORIDE (See NOTE)
XYLENES (Total)
NOTE: Monitoring for vinyl chloride is only required when one or more of the following two-carbon compounds are detected: trichloroethylene,
tetrachloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane.
SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS (SOCs):
ALACHLOR
ATRAZINE
BENZO(A)PYRENE
CARBOFURAN
CHLORDANE
DALAPON
DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL) ADIPATE
DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE
DIBROMOCHLOROPROPANE (DBCP)
DINOSEB
DIQUAT
ENDOTHALL
ETHYLENE DIBROMIDE (EDB)
ENDRIN
GLYPHOSATE
HEPTACHLOR
HEPTACHLOR EPOXIDE
HEXACHLOROBENZENE
HEXACHLOROCYCLOPENTADIENE
LINDANE
METHOXYCHLOR
OXAMYL (VYDATE)
PCBs
1
PENTACHLOROPHENOL
PICLORAM
SIMAZINE
TOXAPHENE
2, 3, 7, 8-TCDD (DIOXIN)
1
2, 4-D
2, 4, 5-TP (SILVEX)
1. Monitoring for PCBs and/or dioxin is required when there is a contamination source within 1,000 feet of the new groundwater source. Provide
details of the assessment in Public Water Supply Module 3A, Part U to support a finding of no sources of contamination.
INORGANIC CHEMICALS (IOCs):
ANTIMONY
ARSENIC
ASBESTOS (See NOTE)
BARIUM
BERYLLIUM
CADMIUM
CHROMIUM
COPPER
CYANIDE (as free cyanide)
FLUORIDE
LEAD
MERCURY
NICKEL
NITRATE (as Nitrogen)
NITRITE (as Nitrogen)
SELENIUM THALLIUM
NOTE: Monitoring for asbestos is required when DEP has reason to believe the source is vulnerable to contamination.

800-0810-002 / Interim Final October 8, 2016 / Page 16
RADIONUCLIDES:
GROSS ALPHA
GROSS BETA (See NOTE)
RADIUM-226, RADIUM-228
URANIUM
NOTE: If the Gross Beta exceeds 50 pCi/L, analyze the same or equivalent sample to identify the major radioactive constituents present.
MICROBIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS:
TOTAL COLIFORMS
CONCENTRATION
Three (3) separate samples obtained at 15-minute intervals immediately prior to the
conclusion of the constant rate aquifer test.
For each Total Coliform positive sample, analyze the same or equivalent sample for
E. coli
concentration.
SECONDARY CONTAMINANTS AND OTHERS:
ALKALINITY
ALUMINUM
CHLORIDE
COLOR
FOAMING AGENTS
HARDNESS
IRON
MANGANESE
pH (See NOTE)
SILVER
SODIUM
SULFATE
TEMPERATURE (See NOTE)
TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS
TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON
TURBIDITY (NTU)
ZINC
NOTE: Temperature and pH measurements may be obtained in the field with a calibrated water quality meter within 15 minutes of sample collection.
(If applicable)
MICROSCOPIC PARTICULATE
ANALYSIS (MPA)
MPA sampling should be conducted by a qualified person for all new
groundwater sources to be used for human consumption which fall
within the criteria of the
Guidance for Surface Water Identification
Protocol
(Document number 383-3500-106), available on DEP’s
website at
www.dep.pa.gov
.
OTHER CONTAMINANTS:
The Department may require monitoring of any other contaminant(s) as determined necessary to adequately evaluate the
quality of the source. Testing for additional contaminates will be determined based upon known current and historical
impacts to the aquifer, known potential sources for contamination and geology.

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